Photo of Ethan Mollick

Ethan Mollick

Edward B. and Shirley R. Shils Assistant Professor of Management

Research Interests: crowdfunding, distributed and user innovation, entrepreneurial strategy, entrepreneurship in innovative industries, games and business, role of individuals in firm success, self-organization among individuals

Links: Personal Website, Twitter


  • MGMT801 - Entrepreneurship

    This is the foundation course in the Entrepreneurial Management program. The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth. While most of the examples in class will be drawn from new venture formation, the principles also apply to entrepreneurship in corporate settings and to non-profit entrepreneurship. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures. The emphasis in this course is on applying and synthesizing concepts and techniques from functional areas of strategic management, finance, accounting, managerial economics, marketing, operations management, and organizational behavior in the context of new venture development. The class serves as both a stand alone class and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and implementing a business plan (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806).

  • MGMT806 - Formation and Implementation of Entrepreneurial Ventures

    This advanced course in entrepreneurship centers on writing a comprehensive business plan and implementation plan for a venture of your choice. The course examines ways to profitably launch and exploit business opportunities (as opposed to what opportunity to explore). It will allow you to acquire the skill set necessary for crafting a winning business model for your venture - developing and writing a coherent and effective plan to start a business in either an independent or a corporate setting. The venture must distinguish itself from existing companies through differential innovation; for example, through an innovative product or service, an innovative production process, a new business model, or by creating a new market. Students must have successfully completed MGMT 801 before enrolling in this course.