Maurice Schweitzer

Maurice Schweitzer
  • Cecilia Yen Koo Professor
  • Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3730 Walnut Street
    544 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Overview

Maurice Schweitzer is the Cecilia Yen Koo Professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on emotions and the negotiation process. He has published over 70 articles in Management, Psychology, and Economics journals and recently co-authored Friend & Foe. Maurice is the academic director of Wharton’s Strategic Decision Making Mindset program and he teaches Advanced Negotiations in Wharton’s executive education, MBA, and undergraduate programs. Maurice has won several teaching and research awards, and he is the incoming president of the International Association for Conflict Management.

Google Talk

Using Humor in the Office

Is Every Lie a Sin?

CBC News – Rise in Corporate Activism

CNN – CEO Activism is on the Rise

Periscope: VW Scandal

Knowledge@Wharton: Friend & Foe

Knowledge@Wharton: Anger and Deception

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Research

  • Zhiying Ren, Andrew Carton, Eugen Dimant, Maurice Schweitzer (2022), Authoritarian Leaders Share Conspiracy Theories to Attack Opponents, Galvanize Followers, Shift Blame, and Undermine Democratic Institutions, Current Opinion in Psychology.

    Abstract: Although many virtuous leaders are guided by the ideal of prioritizing the needs and welfare of their subordinates, others advance their self-interest at the expense of the people they purport to serve. In this article, we discuss conspiracy theories as a tool that leaders use to advance their personal interests. We propose that leaders spread conspiracy theories in service of four primary goals: 1) to attack opponents; 2) to galvanize followers; 3) to shift blame and responsibility; and 4) to undermine institutions that threaten their power. We argue that authoritarian, populist, and conservative leaders are most likely to spread conspiracy theories during periods of instability.

  • Linnea Gandhi, Annie Duke, Maurice Schweitzer, When Adverse Side Effects Derail Debiasing: Attribution Bias in a Popular Debiasing Strategy.

  • Zhiying Ren, Eugen Dimant, Maurice Schweitzer (Under Review), Social Motives for Sharing Conspiracy Theories.

    Abstract: Why do people share conspiracy theories? Recent work suggests that people share misinformation because they are inattentive. We find that people also knowingly share misinformation to advance social motives. Across three preregistered studies (total N=1,560 Prolific workers), we investigate the social motives for sharing conspiracy theories. We find that people are willing to trade off accuracy to build social connections when making content sharing decisions. Moreover, even though people know that factual news are more accurate than conspiracy theories, they expect sharing conspiracy theories to generate higher social value than sharing factual news. Lastly, in an interactive multi-round content-sharing paradigm, we find that social feedback could change the social value people attach to sharing misinformation. Our findings substantially develop our understand of why and when individuals are most likely to share conspiracy theories. These findings also make important contributions to understanding and curbing the spread of misinformation.

  • Polly Kang, Krishnan Anand, Pnina Feldman, Maurice Schweitzer (2020), Insincere Negotiation: Using the Negotiation Process to Pursue Non-Agreement Motives, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 89 (103981).

  • Einav Hart and Maurice Schweitzer (2020), Getting to less: When negotiating harms post-agreement performance, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 156, pp. 155-175.

  • Celia Gaertig, Emma E. Levine, Alixandra Barasch, Maurice Schweitzer (2019), When Does Anger Boost Status?, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 85 (103876).

  • Joseph Gaspar and Maurice Schweitzer (2019), Confident and Cunning: Negotiator Self-Efficacy Promotes Deception in Negotiations, Journal of Business Ethics.

  • Brad Bitterly and Maurice Schweitzer (2019), The economic and interpersonal consequences of deflecting direct questions, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

  • Danielle Warren and Maurice Schweitzer (2019), When weak sanctioning systems work: Evidence from auto insurance industry fraud investigations, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

  • Brad Bitterly and Maurice Schweitzer (2019), The impression management benefits of humorous self-disclosures: How humor influences perceptions of veracity, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 151, pp. 73-89.

Teaching

Maurice Schweitzer teaches both Negotiations and Advanced Negotiations, a course he designed and introduced at Wharton.

An Interview with Wharton Management Professor Maurice Schweitzer (Wharton Interactive)

All Courses

  • LAW5180 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OIDD 691/LGST 806. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • LGST2920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course assumes familiarity with the basic negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: Negotiations. In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations and we develop a deeper understanding for how specific aspects of the negotiation process (e.g., emotions, deadlines, trust violations) impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and case exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

  • LGST6920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This is a course the builds on the basic Negotiation course. In this course, we explore a wide range of negotiation topics from crisis and hostage negotiations, to the role of emotions including anxiety, envy and anger in negotiations, to backlash effects for women in negotiations, and the role of alcohol in negotiations. We will survey many aspects of current negotiation research, discuss historic negotiation cases, and students will participate in role-play exercises. Many of the role play exercises will involve multi-party negotiations and afford opportunities to hone skills in team-based negotiations.

  • LGST8060 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT2920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course assumes familiarity with the basic negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: Negotiations. In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations and we develop a deeper understanding for how specific aspects of the negotiation process (e.g., emotions, deadlines, trust violations) impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and case exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

  • MGMT6910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT6920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This is a course the builds on the basic Negotiation course. In this course, we explore a wide range of negotiation topics from crisis and hostage negotiations, to the role of emotions including anxiety, envy and anger in negotiations, to backlash effects for women in negotiations, and the role of alcohol in negotiations. We will survey many aspects of current negotiation research, discuss historic negotiation cases, and students will participate in role-play exercises. Many of the role play exercises will involve multi-party negotiations and afford opportunities to hone skills in team-based negotiations.

  • OIDD2920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This course is designed to teach negotiation principles and to enable students to develop their negotiation skills. This course assumes familiarity with the basic negotiation concepts covered in the prerequisite for this course: Negotiations. In this course, we extend the study and practice of negotiations and we develop a deeper understanding for how specific aspects of the negotiation process (e.g., emotions, deadlines, trust violations) impact outcomes. Through course lectures, readings, and case exercises, students will develop a rich framework for thinking about the negotiation process and acquire tools for guiding the negotiation process.

  • OIDD2990 - Judg & Dec Making Res Im

    This class provides a high-level introduction to the field of judgment and decision making (JDM) and in-depth exposure to the process of doing research in this area. Throughout the semester you will gain hands-on experience with several different JDM research projects. You will be paired with a PhD student or faculty mentor who is working on a variety of different research studies. Each week you will be given assignments that are central to one or more of these studies, and you will be given detailed descriptions of the research projects you are contributing to and how your assignments relate to the successful completion of these projects. To complement your hands-on research experience, throughout the semester you will be assigned readings from the book Nudge by Thaler and Sunstein, which summarizes key recent ideas in the JDM literature. You will also meet as a group for an hour once every three weeks with the class's faculty supervisor and all of his or her PhD students to discuss the projects you are working on, to discuss the class readings, and to discuss your own research ideas stimulated by getting involved in various projects. Date and time to be mutually agreed upon by supervising faculty and students. the 1CU version of this course will involve approx. 10 hours of research immersion per week and a 10-page paper. The 0.5 CU version of this course will involve approx 5 hours of research immersion per week and a 5-page final paper. Please contact Professor Joseph Simmons if you are interested in enrolling in the course: jsimmo@wharton.upenn.edu

  • OIDD3990 - Supervised Study

    This course number is currently used for several course types including independent studies, experimental courses and Management & Technology Freshman Seminar. Instructor permission required to enroll in any independent study. Wharton Undergraduate students must also receive approval from the Undergraduate Division to register for independent studies. Section 002 is the Management and Technology Freshman Seminar; instruction permission is not required for this section and is only open to M&T students. For Fall 2020, Section 004 is a new course titled AI, Business, and Society. The course provides a overview of AI and its role in business transformation. The purpose of this course is to improve understanding of AI, discuss the many ways in which AI is being used in the industry, and provide a strategic framework for how to bring AI to the center of digital transformation efforts. In terms of AI overview, we will go over a brief technical overview for students who are not actively immersed in AI (topic covered include Big Data, data warehousing, data-mining, different forms of machine learning, etc). In terms of business applications, we will consider applications of AI in media, Finance, retail, and other industries. Finally, we will consider how AI can be used as a source of competitive advantage. We will conclude with a discussion of ethical challenges and a governance framework for AI. No prior technical background is assumed but some interest in (and exposure to) technology is helpful. Every effort is made to build most of the lectures from the basics.

  • OIDD6910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • OIDD6920 - Advanced Negotiation

    This is a course the builds on the basic Negotiation course. In this course, we explore a wide range of negotiation topics from crisis and hostage negotiations, to the role of emotions including anxiety, envy and anger in negotiations, to backlash effects for women in negotiations, and the role of alcohol in negotiations. We will survey many aspects of current negotiation research, discuss historic negotiation cases, and students will participate in role-play exercises. Many of the role play exercises will involve multi-party negotiations and afford opportunities to hone skills in team-based negotiations.

  • OIDD9000 - Foundations of Dec Proc

    The course is an introduction to research on normative, descriptive and prescriptive models of judgement and choice under uncertainty. We will be studying the underlying theory of decision processes as well as applications in individual group and organizational choice. Guest speakers will relate the concepts of decision processes and behavioral economics to applied problems in their area of expertise. As part of the course there will be a theoretical or empirical term paper on the application of decision processes to each student's particular area of interest.

  • OIDD9920 - Conflict Mgmt Seminar

    This seminar exposes students to the central issues in conflict management research. This course covers both analytic and behavioral perspectives of conflict management, and describes how the field has developed. Through discussions of theory and empirical research, the course aims to develop a foundation for understanding the extant literature and how common methodological tools have shaped the types of questions conflict management scholars have investigated - and neglected.

Awards and Honors

  • Best Conference Empirical Paper, International Association for Conflict Management, 2015
  • Finalist for the Exeter Prize in Experimetnal Economics, 2012 Description

    Pope, D. & Schweitzer, M. Is Tiger Woods loss averse? Persistent bias in the face of experience, competition, and high stakes. American Economic Review

    This paper was one of five finalists for the 2012 Exeter Prize for the best paper published in the previous year in Experimental Economics, Behavioral Economics, and Decision Theory.

  • IACM, Best Conference Paper with a Student as First Author, 2010 Description

    Brooks, A. & Schweitzer, M. (2011). Can Nervous Nelly negotiate? How anxiety causes negotiators to make low first offers, exit early, and earn less profit. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 115(1), 43-54.

    This paper won the Best Conference Paper with a Student as First Author Award at the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, 2010.

  • Excellence in Teaching Award for MBA Teaching, Wharton School, 2010
  • Best Paper Award for the Conflict Management Division at the Academy of Management Conference, 2008 Description

    The paper (co-authored with Francesca Gino) is “In the Mood for Advice: The Influence of Emotions on Advice Taking.”

  • Best Empirical Paper Award in Conflict Management, AoM, 2003 Description

    Dunn, J. & Schweitzer, M. (2005). Feeling and believing: The influence of emotion on trust. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88

    This paper won the Best Empirical Paper Award in the Conflict Management Division at the Academy of Management, August 2003. A short version of this paper was published in the Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings, August 2003.

In the News

Activity

In the News

How to Build a Better Relationship at the Bargaining Table

Successful negotiators are frequently seen as uncompromising winners, but driving a hard bargain can create more harm than good. In his latest paper, Wharton’s Maurice Schweitzer explains why negotiators need to think about the long-term relationship with their counterparts.Read More

Knowledge at Wharton - 6/7/2022
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Wharton Magazine

Does a Softer Approach to Negotiation Yield Better Outcomes?
Wharton Magazine - 10/16/2020

Wharton Stories

Bringing the Wharton Experience to High Schoolers Around the World

Each year, hundreds of students travel to Philadelphia to participate in summer high school programs through Wharton’s Global Youth Program, where they take part in courses and activities focused on community-building, peer networking, and on-campus immersion. When Penn’s campus closed due to COVID-19 this summer, the Program had to pivot…

Wharton Stories - 10/02/2020
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