Rachel Arnett

Rachel Arnett
  • Assistant Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2206 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: diversity & inclusion; workplace relationships; identity; race; status; gender; social class

Links: CV, Personal Website

Overview

Rachel Arnett is an Assistant Professor of Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Her research investigates the important role that identities and interpersonal interactions play in cultivating workplace inclusion and enabling professional advancement. In her primary stream of research, she examines when, why, and how individuals express cultural identities or conceal relatively high status identities when interacting with people who differ from themselves, and the influence that these decisions have on employees’ inclusive behaviors towards one another and willingness to promote one another’s professional advancement. While primarily an experimentalist, her research also employs field and qualitative methods. Through her work, she hopes to shed light upon how people from different backgrounds can work together effectively and drive organizational success.

Rachel completed her doctoral training in Harvard University’s Organizational Behavior program, an interdisciplinary program between Harvard Business School and Harvard’s Social Psychology department. Before Harvard, she was a Research Assistant in New York University’s Social Psychology department and a Senior Brand Strategist in the advertising industry. She received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Research

  • Rachel Arnett and J. Sidanius (2018), Sacrificing status for social harmony: Concealing relatively high status identities from one’s peers, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 147, pp. 108-126.

  • Rachel Arnett, B. H. Humberd, J. Clair, K. L. McGinn, K. Chen (Under Review), Class matters: The role of social class and agency in women leader’s legitimacy narratives.

    Description: Invited Resubmission at Organization Science.

  • Rachel Arnett, C. D. Navarrete, J. Sidanius (Under Review), If Michael Brown had been Michelle Brown: Threat-based intergroup prejudice is fundamentally gendered.

    Description: Invited Resubmission at Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.

  • Rachel Arnett (Working), Making diversity win: Cultivating inclusion through expressing cultural identity differences at work.

    Description: In preparation for submission to Organization Science.

  • Rachel Arnett and K. Richards (Working), Enabling cultural authenticity at work: Why employees conceal cultural differences and how to encourage cultural authenticity.

    Description: Data collection in progress. Target journal: Organization Science.

  • Rachel Arnett, K. Knowlton, M. Preston, R. L Schaumberg (Working), Empowering minorities at the negotiation table: Leveraging cultural-identity expression to increase joint negotiation outcomes.

    Description: Data collection in progress. Target journal: Organization Science.

  • Rachel Arnett, J. Scruggs, E. B. Wolf (Working), What if it happened to me? The power of analogous perspective-taking for inciting organizational change.

    Description: Data collection in progress. Target journal: Academy of Management Journal.

  • Rachel Arnett (Working), Gender and high status disclosure.

    Abstract: Data collection in progress. Target journal: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

  • K. Kroeper, A. Rattan, Rachel Arnett, A. Brown, M. Murphy (Working), Not Such a Complainer Anymore: Bias Confrontation that Signals a Growth Mindset can Undercut Backlash.

    Description: Data collection in progress.

  • Rachel Arnett (Working), Who will you become? The role of gender and parental role models in committing to professional & family identities.

    Description: Data analysis in progress. Target journal: Administrative Science Quarterly.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • LGST206 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • LGST806 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • MGMT691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691.

  • OIDD291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • OIDD691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691.

Awards and Honors

  • Most Innovative Student Paper Award, Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division, 2015 Description

    Submission: Me versus us: Concealing high status identities from lower status peers (Awarded to one student in the Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division).

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

Latest Research

Rachel Arnett and J. Sidanius (2018), Sacrificing status for social harmony: Concealing relatively high status identities from one’s peers, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 147, pp. 108-126.
All Research

In the News

How Firms Can Do a Better Job of Leveraging Diversity

Managers and employees must move beyond an abstract notion of diversity if they want to effect real change.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/03/1
All News

Awards and Honors

Most Innovative Student Paper Award, Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division 2015
All Awards