Rachel Arnett

Rachel Arnett
  • Assistant Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2206 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: diversity & inclusion; workplace relationships; identity; race; status; gender; social class

Links: CV, Personal Website

Overview

Rachel Arnett is an Assistant Professor of Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. She is in the Organizational Behavior subgroup with the Management Department and specializes in diversity, identity, inclusion, intergroup relations, and intersectionality. In 2022, she was named by Poets & Quants as one of the Best 40-Under-40 MBA Professors.

Rachel’s research investigates pathways to developing diversity, equity, and inclusion as well as relationships across differences, including how individuals navigate identity-based differences, push for social change, confront bias and discrimination, engage in allyship behaviors, and leverage identities and role models to attain leadership success. In one stream of research, she examines when, why, and how individuals express or conceal identity-based differences (e.g., race, nationality, social class) when interacting with people who differ from themselves, and the consequences for employees’ psychological, interpersonal, and professional outcomes. Another research stream illuminates how organizational DEI goals can be advanced by better leveraging the benefits and counteracting the risks that individuals associate with diversity, equity, and inclusion. This includes understanding the important role of psychological safety for advancing DEI. A third line of work tests how individuals can overcome challenges associated with confronting bias and engaging in effective allyship. Finally, using an intersectional lens, she explores how the interplay between gender, race, and social class influence individuals’ role models and leadership trajectories.

Rachel conducts her research using a combination of laboratory experiments, surveys, and qualitative data. She has partnered with multiple organizations who are interested in advancing DEI, including conducting field experiments, employee surveys, and in-depth interviews.

Rachel completed her doctoral training in Harvard University’s Organizational Behavior program, an interdisciplinary program between Harvard Business School and Harvard’s Social Psychology department. Before Harvard, she was a Research Assistant in New York University’s Social Psychology department and a Senior Brand Strategist in the advertising industry. She received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Research

  • A. Rattan, K. Kroeper, Rachel Arnett, A. Brown, M. Murphy (Forthcoming), Not Such a Complainer Anymore: Bias Confrontation that Signals a Growth Mindset Can Undercut Backlash.

    Description: Accepted at Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

  • Rachel Arnett and J. Sidanius (2018), Sacrificing status for social harmony: Concealing relatively high status identities from one’s peers, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 147, pp. 108-126.

  • Rachel Arnett (Under Revision), Uniting Through Differences: Rich Cultural-Identity Expression as a Conduit to Inclusion.

    Description: Provisionally Accepted at Organization Science.

  • J. Clair, Rachel Arnett, B. H. Humberd, K. Chen, K. L. McGinn (Under Review), Class matters: The role of social class and agency in women leader’s legitimacy narratives.

    Description: Invited Resubmission at Organization Science.

Teaching

All Courses

  • LGST8060 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT6910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • OIDD6910 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 6910/OIDD 6910/LGST 8060. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

Awards and Honors

  • Poets & Quants Best 40-Under-40 MBA Professors, 2022
  • Wharton Teaching Excellence Award, 2021
  • Wharton Teaching Excellence Award, 2020
  • Wharton Teaching Excellence Award, 2019
  • Wharton Teaching Excellence Award, 2018
  • Most Innovative Student Paper Award, Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division, 2015 Description

    Submission: Me versus us: Concealing high status identities from lower status peers (Awarded to one student in the Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division).

In the News

Knowledge at Wharton

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Activity

Latest Research

A. Rattan, K. Kroeper, Rachel Arnett, A. Brown, M. Murphy (Forthcoming), Not Such a Complainer Anymore: Bias Confrontation that Signals a Growth Mindset Can Undercut Backlash.
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In the News

How Firms Can Do a Better Job of Leveraging Diversity

Managers and employees must move beyond an abstract notion of diversity if they want to effect real change. Read More

Knowledge at Wharton - 3/1/2018
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Wharton Stories

Leading Conversations on Diversity & Inclusion with Wharton Staff

Three years ago, my colleagues from the Wharton Undergraduate Division attended a conference, where they were introduced to the importance of intergroup dialogue. The concept of intergroup dialogue proposes that conversations between members of a social group should create stronger relationships and mutual understanding. They knew this would be something…

Wharton Stories - 09/30/2021
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