Rachel Arnett

Rachel Arnett
  • Assistant Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2206 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: diversity & inclusion; workplace relationships; identity; race; status; gender; social class

Links: Personal Website

Overview

Rachel Arnett is an Assistant Professor of Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Her research investigates the important role that identities and interpersonal interactions play in cultivating workplace inclusion and enabling professional advancement. In her primary stream of research, she examines when, why, and how individuals express cultural identities or conceal relatively high status identities when interacting with people who differ from themselves, and the influence that these decisions have on employees’ inclusive behaviors towards one another and willingness to promote one another’s professional advancement. While primarily an experimentalist, her research also employs field and qualitative methods. Through her work, she hopes to shed light upon how people from different backgrounds can work together effectively and drive organizational success.

Rachel completed her doctoral training in Harvard University’s Organizational Behavior program, an interdisciplinary program between Harvard Business School and Harvard’s Social Psychology department. Before Harvard, she was a Research Assistant in New York University’s Social Psychology department and a Senior Brand Strategist in the advertising industry. She received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Research

  • Rachel Arnett and J. Sidanius (Under Review), Sacrificing status for social harmony: Concealing relatively high status identities from one’s peers.

    Description: Previously titled: Me versus us: Concealing high status identities from lower status peers. In preparation for invited second-round re-submission at Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

  • J. Clair, K. L. McGinn, B. H. Humberd, Rachel Arnett (Under Review), Class matters: Narratives of women firsts in social economic context.

    Description: In preparation for invited re-submission at Academy of Management Journal.

  • Rachel Arnett (Working), Making diversity win: Cultivating inclusion through expressing cultural identity differences at work.

    Description: In preparation for submission to Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

  • Rachel Arnett, N. Kteily, C. D. Navarrete, J. Sidanius (Working), If Michael Brown had been Michelle Brown: Fundamental differences in fear-based prejudice toward outgroup men versus women.

    Description: In preparation for submission to Psychological Science.

  • Rachel Arnett (Working), Who will you become? Committing to professional & family identities and the influence of gender and role models.

    Description: In preparation for submission to Academy of Management Journal.

  • Rachel Arnett, F. Gino, B. Staats (Working), When less is more: Fewer job options boosts performance.

    Description: Data collection in progress.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • LGST206 - NEGOTIATION/CONFLICT RES

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills.

  • LGST806 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course includes not only conflict resolution but techniques which help manage and even encourage the valuable aspects of conflict. The central issues of this course deal with understanding the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in conflict management situations. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and processes of negotiations as it is practiced ina variety of settings. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad specturm of problems that are faced by the manager and professional including management of multinationals, ethical issues, and alternative dispute resolutions. Cross listed w/ LGST 206 and OIDD 291.

  • MGMT691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806 and OIDD 691.

  • OIDD291 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and the science of creating good agreements between two or more parties. This course develops managerial negotiation skills by mixing lectures and practice, using cases and exercises in which students negotiate with each other. The cases cover a wide range of problems and settings: one-shot deals between individuals, repeated negotiations, negotiations over several issues, and negotiations among several parties (both within and between organizations). Class participation and case studies account for half the course grade. Students will also write about a negotiation experience outside of class.

  • OIDD691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. In this course we will work on both, studying economics and psychology for the science, and practicing actual negotiations for the art. Throughout we think of negotiation in general terms, relevant not only to salary negotiations and home buying, but performance evaluations, speeches, group collaborations and interpersonal relationships. We practice these kinds of negotiations in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person exercises. Potential reasons to skip this particular negotiation course: 1) We have a strong attendance policy, 2) We have strong no-computers/phones policies, 3) the course is very discussion oriented, 4) We survey your work colleagues about your influence tactics, and 5) you have a short assignment due almost every class. Beginning with the second week of class, if you miss one class you lose a letter grade. If you miss two classes you fail. We have this policy because it is an experiential class, and because your attendance directly affects classmates you are paired with. For some weeks you can attend another section if necessary. Cross-listed with MGMT691 and LGST806.

Awards and Honors

  • Most Innovative Student Paper Award, Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division, 2015 Description

    Submission: Me versus us: Concealing high status identities from lower status peers (Awarded to one student in the Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division).

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

Latest Research

Rachel Arnett and J. Sidanius (Under Review), Sacrificing status for social harmony: Concealing relatively high status identities from one’s peers.
All Research

In the News

How Firms Can Do a Better Job of Leveraging Diversity

Managers and employees must move beyond an abstract notion of diversity if they want to effect real change.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/03/1
All News

Awards and Honors

Most Innovative Student Paper Award, Academy of Management Organizational Behavior Division 2015
All Awards