Mitchell A. Orenstein

Mitchell A. Orenstein
  • Professor of Russian and East European Studies
  • Department Chair

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    746 Williams Hall
    255 S 36th Street
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305

Teaching

Current Courses

  • MGMT208 - Mnging Glob & Anti-glob

    Managing Globalization and Anti-Globalization provides students with a solid foundation in the economic history of globalization and anti-globalization, the institutions that manage the global economy, and the current challenges these institutions are facing. Students in this class will develop their own worldview about the powerful forces shaping today's international political economy and build a solid foundation for understanding the future of organizational strategy. The first half of the course focuses on the historical trajectory of globalization and learning about the institutions that seek to manage it. The second half of the course explores how institutions manage present-day global governance challenges ranging from global migration, the rise of populist anti-globalization movements, the collapse of communism, and global inequality, to disruptive technologies such as bitcoin. Format: Lectures and discussion structured to encourage maximum student participation. Requirements: midterm and final exam, a final course paper of 10-20 pages and short reaction papers dealing with the readings for the week. Supplemental activities include map quizzes, small group projects, and current events analysis.

    MGMT208001

Past Courses

  • MGMT208 - MNGING GLOB & ANTI-GLOB

    Managing Globalization and Anti-Globalization provides students with a solid foundation in the economic history of globalization and anti-globalization, the institutions that manage the global economy, and the current challenges these institutions are facing. Students in this class will develop their own worldview about the powerful forces shaping today's international political economy and build a solid foundation for understanding the future of organizational strategy. The first half of the course focuses on the historical trajectory of globalization and learning about the institutions that seek to manage it. The second half of the course explores how institutions manage present-day global governance challenges ranging from global migration, the rise of populist anti-globalization movements, the collapse of communism, and global inequality, to disruptive technologies such as bitcoin. Format: Lectures and discussion structured to encourage maximum student participation. Requirements: midterm and final exam, a final course paper of 10-20 pages and short reaction papers dealing with the readings for the week. Supplemental activities include map quizzes, small group projects, and current events analysis.

  • PPE 498 - DIRECTED HONORS RESEARCH

    Student arranges with a faculty member to do research and write a thesis on a suitable topic. For more information on honors visit: https://ppe.sas.upenn.edu/study/curriculum/honors-theses

  • PSCI112 - SOCIALISM

    Socialism has become a hot topic in US politics. Some advocate it as an ideology that supports economic equality; others decry it as a path towards excessive state control. But what does the word socialism really mean? Why does it seem to mean different things to different people? What is the historical background of socialism? Are there meaningful differences between different forms of socialism or are they more or less the same thing? Which societies are socialist in practice, both past and present? What about the US? What are the different proposals US and other Socialists make today? What is their logic? How socialist are they? Are their policy ideas or bad? What effects would they have? This course will introduce students to socialism in theory and practice, with an emphasis on different models of Western social democracy and how they are impacting political discourse right now.

  • PSCI144 - COMMUNISM

    The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism.

  • PSCI267 - INT'L AFF:RUSSIA&EASTEUR

    Russia and the European Union (EU) are engaged in a battle for influence in Eastern Europe. EU foreign policy towards its Eastern neighbors is based on economic integration and the carrot of membership. With the application of this powerful incentive, Central and Southeastern European countries such as Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Croatia have progressed rapidly towards integration with the EU (and NATO). Yet, given Russia's opposition to the further enlargement, membership is off the table for the large semi-Western powers such as Russia itself and Turkey and the smaller countries inhabiting an emerging buffer zone between Russia and the EU, such as Georgia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Moldova, and Belarus. These in-between countries find themselves subject to intense competition for influence between Eastern and Western powers. In this context, EU countries must balance their energy dependence on Russia and need for new markets and geopolitical stability with concern for human rights, democratic governance, and self-determination. What are the trade-offs implicit in the foreign policies of Russia, EU member states, and Eastern Europe? What are the best policy approaches? What are the main opportunities and obstacles?

  • PSCI499 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Individual research to be taken under direction of faculty member. Students wishing to complete work on an honors paper should contact the Political Science Department.

  • REES133 - SOCIALISM

    Socialism has become a hot topic in US politics. Some advocate it as an ideology that supports economic equality; others decry it as a path towards excessive state control. But what does the word socialism really mean? Why does it seem to mean different things to different people? What is the historical background of socialism? Are there meaningful differences between different forms of socialism or are they more or less the same thing? Which societies are socialist in practice, both past and present? What about the US? What are the different proposals US and other Socialists make today? What is their logic? How socialist are they? Are their policy ideas or bad? What effects would they have? This course will introduce students to socialism in theory and practice, with an emphasis on different models of Western social democracy and how they are impacting political discourse right now.

  • REES134 - COMMUNISM

    The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism.

  • REES502 - INTRODUCTION TO REES I

    This graduate level seminar provides an introduction to social science approaches to the study of the Eastern half of Europe and Eurasia, including Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, the successor states of Yugoslavia as well as the successor states of the former Soviet Union. Through a selection of articles and essays written by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, demographers, political scientists, and economists, students will explore how social scientific methodologies have been used to understand modern and contemporary society, politics, cultures, and economies of this region from the rise of nationalism in the 19th century to the current day. All readings and assignments in English.

  • REES634 - COMMUNISM

    The rise and fall of Communism dominated the history of the short twentieth century from the Russian revolution of 1917 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. As a system of government, Communism is more or less dead, but its utopian ideals of liberation from exploitation and want live on. Communism remains the one political-economic system that presented, for a time, an alternative to global capitalism. In this course, students will gain an introduction to socialist and Communist political thought and explore Communist political and economic regimes their successes and failures, critics and dissidents, efforts at reform, and causes of collapse. We will learn about the remnants of Communism in China, North Korea, and Cuba and efforts of contemporary theorists to imagine a future for Communism.

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