Jerry Jacobs

Jerry Jacobs
  • Professor of Sociology
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    365 McNeil Building

Teaching

Current Courses (Fall 2022)

  • SOCI0008 - Work And Careers

    The premise of the class is that the workplace is undergoing major transformations that may well generate jobs, careers and organizations quite different from those currently in place. Many interrelated changes are underway, including: globalization, the information and internet revolutions, the diffusion of monitoring and evaluation systems, the mechanization and automation of many jobs and industries, the prospect of working remotely and the growing diversity of the labor force. These changes can be best understood by studying contemporary developments along with placing these changes in an historical perspective. By examining how the theory and practice of work have evolved over the last century and a half, we will be in a better position to understand the changes already in progress and those that may transform work and the workplace over the course of your careers.

    SOCI0008001

  • SOCI2420 - Social Prob & Pub Policy

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

    SOCI2420001

All Courses

  • AFRC1000 - Intro to Sociology

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

  • SOCI0008 - Work and Careers

    The premise of the class is that the workplace is undergoing major transformations that may well generate jobs, careers and organizations quite different from those currently in place. Many interrelated changes are underway, including: globalization, the information and internet revolutions, the diffusion of monitoring and evaluation systems, the mechanization and automation of many jobs and industries, the prospect of working remotely and the growing diversity of the labor force. These changes can be best understood by studying contemporary developments along with placing these changes in an historical perspective. By examining how the theory and practice of work have evolved over the last century and a half, we will be in a better position to understand the changes already in progress and those that may transform work and the workplace over the course of your careers.

  • SOCI1000 - Intro to Sociology

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

  • SOCI2420 - Social Prob & Pub Policy

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

  • SOCI3000 - Sociological Theory

    This course will introduce students to sociological theory until the 1970s. We will read excerpts of original works from key theorists in, or influencing, the discipline. We will read original works of Tocqueville, Marx, Weber, Durkheim, DuBois, Gramsci, Marcuse, C. Wright Mills and more. We will also read a few more recent works echoing classical theory. The goal of this course is to help students understand the core concepts, including those of class, race, power, markets and the state, in classical sociological theory and to sharpen their own sociological imaginations.

  • SOCI3998 - Independent Study

    Directed readings and research in areas of sociology. Permission of instructor needed.

  • SOCI4998 - Honors Independent Study

    Independent study section for senior Sociology majors working on an honors thesis. Students are assigned an advisor by the undergraduate chair.

  • SOCI5550 - Professionalization Sem

    In the non-credit seminar students will be introduce to key areas in sociological research, and a set of professional skills necessary to navigate graduate school and a successful academic career. Students will also be introduced to faculty and resources available at Penn. This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Sociology

  • SOCI5620 - Soci Movements & Poli Sc

    This course explores the impact of systems of government on the collective call to action of populations, and vice versa. Through a local, national, and global lens, this course analyzes the tensions that are produced by the at-times divergent priorities of those in political power versus those who seek social progress and change.

  • SOCI9999 - Independent Rdgs & Res

    For advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

  • SOSC1020 - Addressing Contemporary

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by reviewing "the social construction of social problems." This approach examines how various issues become defined as social problems with a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are then developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

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