Jerry Jacobs

Jerry Jacobs
  • Professor of Sociology
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    365 McNeil Building

Teaching

Current Courses

  • AFRC002 - Intro To Sociology

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

    AFRC002401

  • SOCI001 - Intro To Sociology

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

    SOCI001401

  • SOCI125 - Class Soc Theory

    This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors.

    SOCI125301

Past Courses

  • AFRC002 - INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

  • DEMG707 - SECOND-YEAR RESEARCH SEM

    This course is intended to hone the skills and judgment in order to conduct independent research in sociology and demography. We will discuss the selection of intellectually strategic research questions and practical research designs. Students will get experience with proposal writing, the process of editing successive drafts of manuscripts, and the oral presentation of work in progress as well as finished research projects. The course is designed to be the context in which master's papers and second year research papers are written. This is a required course for second year graduate students in Demography. Others interested in enrolling in only one of the courses may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

  • DEMG708 - SECOND YEAR RESEARCH SEM

    Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In DEMG 708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

  • EDUC543 - UNDERSTANDING MSI'S

    Students taking this course will learn about the historical context of HBCUs in educating African Americans, and how their role has changed since the mid- 1800's. Specific contemporary challenges and successes related to HBCUs will be covered and relate to control, and enrollment, accreditation, funding, degree completion, and outreach/retention programming. Students will become familiar with MBCUs in their own right, as well as in comparison to other postsecondary institutions.

  • MLA 699 - CAPSTONE PROJECT

    Please be in touch with the department for further details

  • SOCI001 - INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

  • SOCI002 - SOCIAL PROB & PUB POLICY

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

  • SOCI010 - SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

    In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others.

  • SOCI041 - FRESHMAN SEMINARS

  • SOCI125 - CLASS SOC THEORY

    This course will cover the founding classics of the sociological tradition including works of Tocqueville, Marx and Engels, Weber, Durkheim, Mauss, Simmel, and G.H.Mead. We will also examine how the major traditions have continued and transformed into theories of conflict, domination, resistance and social change; social solidarity, ritual and symbolism; symbolic interactionist and phenomenological theory of discourse, self and mind. This course satisfies the theory requirement for sociology majors.

  • SOCI299 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Directed readings and research in areas of sociology. Permission of instructor needed.

  • SOCI398 - SENIOR RESEARCH

    Senior Research is for senior sociology majors only. Students are assigned Sociology advisors with assistance from Undergraduate Chair.

  • SOCI399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Independent study section for senior Sociology majors working on an honors thesis. Students are assigned an advisor by the undergraduate chair.

  • SOCI541 - GEND.,LBR FOR & LAB MKT

    Drawing from sociology, economics and demography, this course examines the causes and effects of gender differences in labor force participation, earnings and occupation in the United States and in the rest of the developed and developing world. Differences by race, ethnicity and sexual preference are also considered. Theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination are explored as explanations for the observed trends. Finally, the course reviews current labor market policies and uses the theories of labor supply, marriage, human capital and discrimination to evaluate their effects on women and men.

  • SOCI555 - PROFESSIONALIZATION SEM

    In the non-credit seminar students will be introduce to key areas in sociological research, and a set of professional skills necessary to navigate graduate school and a successful academic career. Students will also be introduced to faculty and resources available at Penn. This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Sociology

  • SOCI556 - PRO SEM SOCIO CONCEP II

    This graduate seminar for first-year graduate students will be a two-semester course covering the major subfields of sociology -- their classical and contemporary theories, current methods and substance.

  • SOCI562 - SOCI MOVEMENTS & POLI SC

  • SOCI603 - PROSEM IN SOC RESEARCH

    This graduate course is intended to be helpful to students as they produce an MA thesis. The course is structured to provide social support and feedback as students move through the stages in the development of a project (i.e. data analysis, review of the literature, development of a thesis, and revision). Students should begin the semester with a data set in hand; additional data analysis will occur during the term. (In some cases, students may be finishing their data collection.) In addition, the course is intended to provided professional development opportunities for students by providing "insider" information about the publication process. Students will be given examples of journal review (including reviews that reject a paper), copies of papers as they move through the revision process, and guidelines for producing a publishable piece of work The goal is for students to produce a manuscript that can be submitted for publication in the near future. This is a required course for second year gradate students in Sociology.

  • SOCI620 - SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH II

    This course is intended to aid in the selection, framing, writing and revising of sociological dissertation proposals. It is also intended to provide a forum for the presentation of dissertation research in progress. The goal is to provide a forum for the acquisition of professional socialization in sociology. We will discuss the framing of research questions, the design of research strategies, and the writing of dissertation proposals. We will discuss the process of submitting manuscripts for conferences and journals, preparing a curriculum vitae, job search strategies, and preparing for effective colloquium presentations. We will also review articles currently under review at the American Sociological Review. It is expected that third year graduate students in Sociology will enroll in this class. Open to third-year graduate students.

  • SOCI998 - INDEPENDENT RDGS & RES

    For advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

  • SOCI999 - DIRECTED RDGS & RES

    Primarily for advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

  • SOSC102 - ADDRESSING CONTEMPORARY

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by reviewing "the social construction of social problems." This approach examines how various issues become defined as social problems with a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are then developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

Knowledge@Wharton

Three Steps for Creating a More Equitable Workplace

As part of the Leading Diversity at Work series, Wharton’s Stephanie Creary talks with Kwasi Mitchell of Deloitte Consulting about how executives, middle managers and employees can contribute to diversity and inclusion initiatives.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/09/22
COVID Crisis: Balancing Health Care and Economic Policy

The pandemic has disproportionately hurt weaker segments of society. Wharton’s Guy David discusses why that needs to be addressed.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/09/22
How to Select Your Mutual Fund? Look for Clarity

S&P 500 index funds tend to obfuscate high fees with unnecessary complexity in their disclosures, according to new research co-authored by Wharton’s Christina Zhu.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2020/09/21