Jerry Jacobs

Jerry Jacobs
  • Professor of Sociology
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    365 McNeil Building

Teaching

Past Courses

  • AFRC002 - INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

    We live in a country which places a premium on indivi dual accomplishments. Hence, all of you worked extremely hard to get into Penn. Yet, social factors also have an impact on life chance. This class provides an overview of how membership in social groups shapes the outcomes of individuals. We will look at a range of topics from the organizational factors which promoted racial inequality in Ferguson, Mo to the refusal of (mostly elite) parents to vaccinate their children. The experience of women and men in the labor market -- and the social factors that lead women to earn less than men -- is another interesting topic taken up in the course. Who gets ahead in America? Course requirements include a midterm, research paper (five to six pages), final and recitation activities. Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge of the topic. Welcome to the course!

  • DEMG707 - SECOND-YEAR RESEARCH SEM

    This course is intended to hone the skills and judgment in order to conduct independent research in sociology and demography. We will discuss the selection of intellectually strategic research questions and practical research designs. Students will get experience with proposal writing, the process of editing successive drafts of manuscripts, and the oral presentation of work in progress as well as finished research projects. The course is designed to be the context in which master's papers and second year research papers are written. This is a required course for second year graduate students in Demography. Others interested in enrolling in only one of the courses may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

  • DEMG708 - SECOND YEAR RESEARCH SEM

    Demography 708 is the second part of a two-course sequence designed to introduce and familiarize second year students with current norms for academic research, presentation and publishing in the field of Demography. In DEMG 708 students are expected to finalize the analyses and to complete their second year research paper. This is a required course for second year demography students. Others interested in enrolling in the course may do so with the permission of the Chair of the Graduate Group in Demography.

  • EDUC543 - UNDERSTANDING MSI'S

    Students taking this course will learn about the historical context of HBCUs in educating African Americans, and how their role has changed since the mid- 1800's. Specific contemporary challenges and successes related to HBCUs will be covered and relate to control, and enrollment, accreditation, funding, degree completion, and outreach/retention programming. Students will become familiar with MBCUs in their own right, as well as in comparison to other postsecondary institutions.

  • MGMT104 - INDUS REL & HUM RES MGMT

    This undergraduate core course introduces students to a combination of basic concepts and timely topics around work and employment. As such, it is divided into two main sections and two quarters within each of those. The first main section deals with micro-level work issues, while the second main section deals with macro-level work issues. Within each of those sections, the first quarter focuses on basic concepts, while the quarter section deals with more applied topics.

  • SOCI001 - INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

    Sociology provides a unique way to look at human behavior and social interaction. Sociology is the systematic study of the groups and societies in which people live. In this introductory course, we analyze how social structures and cultures are created, maintained, and changed, and how they affect the lives of individuals. We will consider what theory and research can tell us about our social world.

  • SOCI002 - SOCIAL PROB & PUB POLICY

    This course approaches some of today's important social and political issues from a sociological vantage point. The course begins by asking where social problems come from. The main sociological perspectives of Marx, Weber and Durkheim are developed in connection with the issues of inequality, social conflict and community. We then turn to the social construction of social problems by examining how various issues become defined as social problems. This involves a consideration of the role of the media, social experts and social movements. The last section of the course considers how social problems are addressed. Here we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of government programs and regulations versus market-based approached. We also discuss the role of philanthropy and volunteerism. Finally, we consider the risk of unanticipated consequences of reforms. Along the way, we will consider a variety of social issues and social problems, including poverty, immigration, crime, global warming, and education.

  • SOCI010 - SOCIAL STRATIFICATION

    In this course we study the current levels and historical trends of inequality in the United States especially in cross-national comparative perspective. We discuss causes and consequences of inequality as well as various policy efforts to deal with inequality. Topics include intergenerational social mobility, income inequality, education, gender, race and ethnicity among others.

  • SOCI041 - FRESHMAN SEMINARS

  • SOCI299 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Directed readings and research in areas of sociology. Permission of instructor needed.

  • SOCI398 - SENIOR RESEARCH

    Senior Research is for senior sociology majors only. Students are assigned Sociology advisors with assistance from Undergraduate Chair.

  • SOCI555 - PROFESSIONALIZATION SEM

    In the non-credit seminar students will be introduce to key areas in sociological research, and a set of professional skills necessary to navigate graduate school and a successful academic career. Students will also be introduced to faculty and resources available at Penn. This course is required for all first-year graduate students in Sociology

  • SOCI556 - PRO SEM SOCIO CONCEP II

    This graduate seminar for first-year graduate students will be a two-semester course covering the major subfields of sociology -- their classical and contemporary theories, current methods and substance.

  • SOCI562 - SOCI MOVEMENTS & POLI SC

  • SOCI603 - PROSEM IN SOC RESEARCH

    This graduate course is intended to be helpful to students as they produce an MA thesis. The course is structured to provide social support and feedback as students move through the stages in the development of a project (i.e. data analysis, review of the literature, development of a thesis, and revision). Students should begin the semester with a data set in hand; additional data analysis will occur during the term. (In some cases, students may be finishing their data collection.) In addition, the course is intended to provided professional development opportunities for students by providing "insider" information about the publication process. Students will be given examples of journal review (including reviews that reject a paper), copies of papers as they move through the revision process, and guidelines for producing a publishable piece of work The goal is for students to produce a manuscript that can be submitted for publication in the near future. This is a required course for second year gradate students in Sociology.

  • SOCI620 - SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH II

    This course is intended to aid in the selection, framing, writing and revising of sociological dissertation proposals. It is also intended to provide a forum for the presentation of dissertation research in progress. The goal is to provide a forum for the acquisition of professional socialization in sociology. We will discuss the framing of research questions, the design of research strategies, and the writing of dissertation proposals. We will discuss the process of submitting manuscripts for conferences and journals, preparing a curriculum vitae, job search strategies, and preparing for effective colloquium presentations. We will also review articles currently under review at the American Sociological Review. It is expected that third year graduate students in Sociology will enroll in this class.

  • SOCI998 - INDEPENDENT RDGS & RES

    For advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

  • SOCI999 - DIRECTED RDGS & RES

    Primarily for advanced students who work with individual instructors upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses.

Knowledge@Wharton

Sin and Soda: Can We Tax Our Way to Healthier Behavior?

New Wharton research analyzes the results of a tax on sugary beverages to determine the optimal rate.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/24
Why the Fed Has a Hidden Influence on Foreign Affairs

The Fed is largely seen as a domestic institution, but it quietly holds enormous sway on foreign affairs. Two Wharton professors ask: Should Congress have some input?

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/24
The Rising Risks — and Opportunities — Confronting Global Agriculture

Dramatic changes in climate, consumer tastes, supply chains and technologies are upending the old order in global agriculture.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/05/23