Thomas Gerrity

Thomas Gerrity
  • Joseph J. Aresty Professor Emeritus

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2000 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: leadership and organizational development

Overview

Education

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1970; MSEE, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1964; BSEE, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1963

Career and Recent Professional Awards; Teaching Awards

Rhodes Scholar, Oxford University, 1964-65

Academic Positions Held

Wharton: 1990-present (named Joseph J. Aresty Professor, 2001; Dean, 1990-99). Previous appointment: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Other Positions

President, CSC Consulting, 1989-90; Corporate Vice President, Computer Sciences Corporation, 1989-90; Chairman and CEO, Index Group, Inc., 1969-89

Professional Leadership

Member, Committee for Economic Development, 1995-present CORPORATE AND PUBLIC SECTOR LEADERSHIP 2005-2009 Member of several corporate and not-for-profit boards

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • MGMT892 - ADV STUDY-ORGAN EFFECT

    Business success is increasingly driven by a firm's ability to create and capture value through innovation. Thus, the processes used by firms to develop innovations, the choices they make regarding how to commercialize their innovations, the changes they make to their business models to adapt to the dynamic environment, and the strategies they use to position and build a dominate competitive position are important issues facing firms. In MGMT. 892, you will learn to address these issues through an action learning approach. MGMT. 892 is a 1.0-credit course conducted in the spirit of an independent study. By working on consulting projects for leading global companies, you will develop and then apply your knowledge about innovation management and help these firms better understand the challenges and opportunities posed by emerging technologies and markets.

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

In the News

CEOs and Market Woes: Is Poor Corporate Governance to Blame?

Many shareholder advocates see the financial collapse and resulting economic woes as stunning proof of their long-held claim that too often the wrong people are in charge of top corporations -- and that attacking this problem demands an overhaul in corporate-governance regulations. But not everyone sees governance as the culprit, and some warn that a kneejerk attack on established corporate practices could backfire.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2008/12/10
All News