Photo of Andrew Carton

Andrew Carton

Assistant Professor

Research Interests: intergroup behavior, goal systems

Links: CV

Contact Information

Address: 2029 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: carton@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (973) 441-7955
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

Research

I study the micro-level (cognitive and interpersonal) foundations of organizing and leadership. An organization is a set of groups who share common goals and leadership is the act of influencing that set of groups to pursue shared goals. Recently, our understanding of groups and goals has changed. The behavior between groups (i.e., intergroup relations) has become more complex due to increasing diversity (e.g., greater functional and demographic diversity). Meanwhile, scholars have begun to acknowledge that leaders oversee employees who do not pursue a single goal at a time, but are instead driven by a vast number of personal and career goals. Despite widespread acknowledgement of the complexity of groups and goals, we know relatively little about how leaders have adapted to these changes. Which groups do leaders emerge from? How should leaders help employees shift attention between different goals? Are leaders capable of navigating greater differences in groups and goals to promote positive outcomes for a diverse set of employees as well as other stakeholders? By centering my research on intergroup behavior and goal systems, I hope to shed light on some of these fundamental questions.

Research

Research

I study the micro-level (cognitive and interpersonal) foundations of organizing and leadership. An organization is a set of groups who share common goals and leadership is the act of influencing that set of groups to pursue shared goals. Recently, our understanding of groups and goals has changed. The behavior between groups (i.e., intergroup relations) has become more complex due to increasing diversity in functional groups and social groups. Meanwhile, scholars have begun to acknowledge that leaders oversee employees who do not pursue a single goal at a time, but are instead driven by a vast number of personal and career goals. Despite widespread acknowledgement of the complexity of groups and goals, we know relatively little about how leaders have adapted to these changes. Which groups do leaders emerge from? How should leaders help employees shift attention between different goals? Are leaders capable of navigating greater differences in groups and goals to promote positive outcomes for a diverse set of employees as well as other stakeholders? By centering my research on intergroup behavior and goal systems, I hope to shed light on these fundamental questions.


  • Cindy Zapata, Andrew Carton, Joseph Liu (2015), When justice promotes injustice: Why minority supervisors experience bias when they adhere to interpersonal justice rules, Academy of Management Journal
  • Andrew Carton, Chad Murphy, Jonathan R. Clark, Vision and Values  Description
  • Andrew Carton, Chad Murphy, Jonathan R. Clark (2014), A (blurry) vision of the future: How leader rhetoric about ultimate goals influences performance, Academy of Management Journal
  • A.S. Rosette, Andrew Carton, L. Bowes-Sperry, P. F. Hewlin (2013), Why do racial slurs remain prevalent in the workplace? Integrating theory on intergroup behavior, Organization Science
  • Andrew Carton, J. N. Cummings (2013), The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance, Journal of Applied Psychology
  • Andrew Carton, J.N. Cummings (2012), A theory of subgroups in work teams, Academy of Management Review, 37 (3), 441 - 470.
  • Andrew Carton, A.S. Rosette (2011), Explaining bias against Black leaders: Integrating theory on information processing and goal-based stereotyping, Academy of Management Journal, 54 (6), 1141 - 1158.
  • Andrew Carton, J. N. Cummings, Striking a balance: The impact of balanced versus imbalanced subgroups on work team performance  Description
  • S.B. Sitkin, K.E. See, C.C. Miller, M. Lawless, Andrew Carton (2011), The paradox of stretch goals: Organizations in pursuit of the seemingly impossible., Academy of Management Review, 36 (3), 544 - 566.
  • Andrew Carton, R.P. Larrick, L. Page, Back to the grind: How attention affects satisfaction during goal pursuit  Description
  • R.P. Larrick, T. Timmerman, Andrew Carton, J. Abrevaya (2011), Temper, temperature, and temptation: Heat-related retaliation in baseball, Psychological Science, 22 (4), 423 - 428.
  • Andrew Carton, J. N. Cummings, A faultline-based model of team leadership  Description
  • Andrew Carton, J. R. Aiello (2009), Control and anticipation of social interruptions: Reduced stress and improved task performance, Journal of Applied Social Psychology
  • Andrew Carton, Enhancing leadership theories with goal structure  Description

Awards And Honors

  • Rapaport Award for Undergraduate Teaching, 2015 Description
  • Best Paper Award in MOC division, 2014
  • Best Reviewer Award, Academy of Management Journal, 2014
  • Cialdini Award (publication that best uses field settings to demonstrate the importance of social psychological phenomena), 2012
  • Keynote Speaker, University of Cambridge Judge Doctoral Conference, 2012
  • Outstanding Reviewer Award, MOC division, Academy of Management, 2012
  • Best Paper Award, Academy of Management Review, 2011
  • Runner-up, Best OB Publication, OB division, Academy of Management, 2011
  • Duke: Winner for Best Dissertation on Small Groups, American Psychological Association, 2011
  • Duke: Finalist for Best Student Paper Award, MOC division. Academy of Management Conference, San Antonio, TX, 2011 Description
  • Duke: Best Paper Proceedings, MOC division , 2011
  • Duke: Outstanding Student Reviewer Award, MOC division, Academy of Management Conference, Montreal, Quebec, 2010
  • Duke: Summer Research Fellowship, 2010
  • Duke: Best Student Paper Award, MOC division (sole winner), Academy of Management Conference, Chicago, IL, 2009
  • Duke: Finalist for Best Student Paper Award, MOC division, Academy of Management Conference, Anaheim, CA, 2008
  • Duke: Best Paper Proceedings, MOC division , 2008-2009

Courses

Previous

  • MGMT101 - Introduction To Management

    This course is an introduction to the critical management skills involved in planning, structuring, controlling and leading an organization. It provides a framework for understanding issues involved in both managing and being managed, and it will help you to be a more effective contributor to organizations that you join. We develop a "systems" view of organizations, which means that we examine organizations as part of a context, including but not limited to environment, strategy, structure, culture, tasks, people and outputs. We consider how managerial decisions made in any one of these domains affect decisions in each of the others.