Photo of Philip Tetlock

Philip Tetlock

Leonore Annenberg University Professor in Democracy and Citizenship

Professor of Management

Professor of Psychology

Research Interests: social and cultural psychology, decision processes

Links: CV, Personal Website, Department of Psychology


  • MGMT276 - Cultivating Judgment Skills: Forecasting in Business Politics

    This course will explore the diverse ways in which scholars and practitioners have defined "good judgment." And it will introduce students to practical tools for assessing and improving judgment, with special emphasis on probabilistic reasoning. Students will have the opportunity both to fine-tune their personal judgment skills as well as to master and then weave together insights from several bodies of scientific knowledge, including frequentist and Bayesian statistics, psychological work on judgment and choice, group dynamics, organizational behavior and political science (key concepts discussed in Tetlock's (2015) book "Superforecasting").

    We will focus on bottom-line accuracy in sizing up real world problems. Class work will be primarily exercises, including working as an individual and in teams. You will have opportunities to forecast on a wide range of political, business, and macro-economic questions, which we will use as feedback tools to help you calibrate your judgment. Assessments include a weekly concept test and a final group presentation aimed to help you improve your judgment. The goal is to launch you on the lifelong process of learning how much trust you should place in your judgments of trustworthiness.

    Finally, note this has been approved by the Curriculum Committee effective 11/11/15.

  • MGMT933 - Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Research in Management

    This course, is required of all first-year doctoral students in Management and open to other Penn students with permission, provides an introduction to the psychological and sociological roots of management theory and research. The courseis predicated on the belief that to be effective as a contemporary management scholar one needs a background in "the classics." Therefore, we will be reading classics from the fields of psychology and sociology in their original form during this semester.