Njoke Khalifa Thomas

Njoke Khalifa Thomas
  • Postdoctoral Fellow

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3027 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Overview

Njoke Thomas is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Her research investigates the important role that professional identities play in facilitating meaningful work and productive workplace interactions. In her primary research stream she investigates critical events in the socialization and training of medical professionals. Her work offers insights on how newcomers to a profession move from an idealized vision of their future work to a more realistic but meaningful enactment. Her findings are informing an intervention (in development) aimed at bolstering medical student well-being and long term professional fulfillment.

Njoke completed her doctoral training in organizational behavior at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. While there, she taught introductory courses in leadership and business communication. She also participated in curriculum design and implementation of a university-wide initiative to promote interprofessional learning among medical, dental, nursing, public health and social work students.

Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree she managed the Colorado Trust’s Equality in Health Initiative, a multi-year program aimed at promoting culturally appropriate practices in health care provision and medical education statewide. Njoke holds a B.A. in Human Biology from Stanford University and a M.S. in Public Health from Harvard University.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • LGST806 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806 and OIDD 691.

  • OIDD691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. In this course we will work on both, studying economics and psychology for the science, and practicing actual negotiations for the art. Throughout we think of negotiation in general terms, relevant not only to salary negotiations and home buying, but performance evaluations, speeches, group collaborations and interpersonal relationships. We practice these kinds of negotiations in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person exercises. Potential reasons to skip this particular negotiation course: 1) We have a strong attendance policy, 2) We have strong no-computers/phones policies, 3) the course is very discussion oriented, 4) We survey your work colleagues about your influence tactics, and 5) you have a short assignment due almost every class. Beginning with the second week of class, if you miss one class you lose a letter grade. If you miss two classes you fail. We have this policy because it is an experiential class, and because your attendance directly affects classmates you are paired with. For some weeks you can attend another section if necessary. Cross-listed with MGMT691 and LGST806.

Knowledge@Wharton

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With High-Deductible Employer Health Plans, Who Wins?

High-deductible employer health plans are cheaper for businesses and may also be cheaper for employees. But are they too much of a gamble?

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Why Automakers Are Driving for Uniform Fuel Efficiency Standards

Having more than one fuel efficiency standard in the U.S. puts automakers in a bad position in terms of planning investments and adopting new technologies. Is there a middle ground that will work for regulators and auto companies alike?

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/06/14