Dana Harari

Dana Harari
  • Postdoctoral Fellow

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3021 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Links: CV

Research

  • Dorit Efrat-Treister, Arik Cheshin, Dana Harari, Anat Rafaeli, Shira Agasi, Hadar Moriah, Hanna Admi (2019), How psychology might alleviate violence in queues: Perceived future wait and perceived load moderate violence against service providers, PLoS One, 14 (7).

  • Dana Harari, Brian W. Swider, Laurens Bujold Steed, Amy P. Breidenthal (2018), Is perfect good? A meta-analysis of perfectionism in the workplace, Journal of Applied Psychology, 103 (10), pp. 1121-1144.

    Abstract: Although the concept of perfectionism is familiar to most people, its relationships with organizationally relevant variables remain unclear because of the dispersed and multidisciplinary nature of extant research. The state of the literature is particularly concerning given the likely widespread influence perfectionism has on individuals’ workplace attitudes and behaviors. Moreover, research in multiple disciplines of psychology has revealed the phenomenon of perfectionism to be multidimensional. In addition, the totality of effects surrounding perfectionism remains unclear as perfectionism carries both benefits as well as consequences for employees and organizations. To cogently synthesize and empirically disentangle the possible differential effects associated with perfectionism at work, the authors conducted a meta-analysis of perfectionism and work-related antecedents and outcomes. The resulting qualitative and quantitative review reveals perfectionism to have sizable and consistent relationships with several organizationally relevant factors but an equivocal overall relationship with job performance. The authors provide a theoretical and empirical overview of the state of the literature and suggest avenues for future research that may facilitate better integration of perfectionism into organizational research.

  • Kerry Roberts Gibson, Dana Harari, Jennifer Carson Marr (2018), When sharing hurts: How and why self-disclosing weakness undermines the task-oriented relationships of higher status disclosers, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 144, pp. 25-43.

    Abstract: It is generally believed that self-disclosure has positive effects, particularly for relationships; however, we predict and find negative effects in the context of task-oriented relationships. Across three laboratory experiments, we find that both task-relevant (Study 1) and task-irrelevant (Studies 2 and 3) weakness disclosures, made by a higher (versus peer) status coworker during an interdependent task, negatively affected the receiver’s perception of the discloser’s status and consequently undermined the discloser’s influence, encouraged task conflict, and led to lower relationship quality with the discloser. Peer status disclosers did not trigger these negative responses. We find support for perceived vulnerability as the proposed psychological process (Study 3). Specifically, higher (but not peer) status disclosers experience a status penalty after weakness disclosures because these disclosures signal vulnerability, which violates the expectations people have for higher (but not peer) status coworkers. These findings provide insight into the effects of self-disclosing weakness at work and the ways in which high status employees may inadvertently trigger their own status loss.

  • B. W. Swider, Dana Harari, A. P. Breidenthal, L. B. Steed (2018), The Pros and Cons of Perfectionism, According to Research, Harvard Business Review.

  • Dana Harari (2016), The steeper the rise, the more you give? Employees\’ status changes and professional volunteering, Best Paper Proceedings of the 2016 Academy of Management.

  • Dana Harari, Jennifer Carson Marr, T. C. Blum (Working), Status makes you give your time: Status change effects of volunteering.

    Description: Manuscript in preparation for submission to Academy of Management Journal.

Activity

Latest Research

Dorit Efrat-Treister, Arik Cheshin, Dana Harari, Anat Rafaeli, Shira Agasi, Hadar Moriah, Hanna Admi (2019), How psychology might alleviate violence in queues: Perceived future wait and perceived load moderate violence against service providers, PLoS One, 14 (7).
All Research