Eric K. Clemons

Eric K. Clemons
  • Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions
  • Professor of Management

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3730 Walnut Street
    572 Jon M. Huntsman Hall
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: information technology and business strategy, information technology and financial markets, making the decision to invest in strategic information technology ventures, managing the risk of strategic information technology implementations, risk-reward tradeoffs in outsourcing and off-shoring, strategic implications of electronic commerce for channel power and profitability

Links: CV

Overview

Dr. Eric K. Clemons is Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. A pioneer in the systematic study of the transformational impacts of information on the strategy and practice of business, his research and teaching interests include strategic uses of information systems, information economics, and the changes enabled by information technology.

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Research

  • Eric K. Clemons and Heinz Schimmelbusch (Working), Measuring Return on Strategic Agility: The Power of Agility when Facing Uncertainty and Strategic Ambiguity.

  • Eric K. Clemons and B. Blecherman (Working), Piloting Uncharted Rapids: Successfully Leading Information-Driven Business Transformation.

  • Eric K. Clemons and Steve Barnett (Working), Strategic Uncertainty and Alternative Futures: Evaluating Our Options in the Post-September 11 World.

  • Eric K. Clemons and Steve Barnett (Working), The Internet and China: Strategic Implications For China and the West.

  • Eric K. Clemons and Rick Spitler (Working), The Road Map for eCommerce: Mastering the Territory, Setting Your Strategy.

  • Eric K. Clemons and Elizabeth T. Gray, jr (Working), Vendor Relationship Management: The Role of Shared History and the Value of Return on Trust.

    Abstract: Information technology outsourcing has become too important to ignore, or to delegate. The twin goals remain unchanged — (1) creating and retaining economic value over time while (2) controlling exposure and strategic risks — but the scale of both the upside gain and downside risk have become enormous. Fortunately, as we shall show in this article, setting strategy for outsourcing is principally a leadership issue, not a technical issue, and thus now falls squarely within executives’ expertise and experience. Managing sourcing is principally about setting a strategy, based on economic objectives, communicating those objectives within and between firms, and managing psychology and expectations when the high economic stakes cause communications to break down. Successfully managing expectations and maintaining effective communications leads to trust, which, we have seen, produces great and measurable economic benefits in strategic sourcing relationships.

  • Eric K. Clemons and M. C. Row (Working), Alternative futures for Electronic Customer Interaction: Market Structures and Competitive Strategies.

  • Eric K. Clemons (Working), Victory: Information Endowment, Hyper-Differentiation, And Non-Information Goods.

  • Eric K. Clemons and S. P. Reddi (Working), An Analysis of the Impact of Information Technology on the Organization of Economic Activity.

  • Noi Sian Koh, Hu Nan, Eric K. Clemons (Forthcoming), Do Online Reviews Reflect a Product’s True Perceived Quality—An Investigation of Online Movie Reviews Across Cultures, ECommerce Research and Applications.

Teaching

Current Courses

  • OIDD613 - Online Business Models

    Information technology has transformed many industries, including media, financial services, and retailing, among others. These technologies have changed not only how we produce services (e.g., outsourcing and offshoring, and their newest extension, cloud computing) but what services we offer (virtual experiences, online advertising, long tail products and services, and social networking). The purpose of this course is to improve understanding of how information technologies enable transformation of business models within existing organizations as well as the development of completely new business models and new organizational forms. The course will serve as an introductory course on information technologies and will serve as a foundation on which students can explore more advanced technology concepts.

    OIDD613001 ( Syllabus )

    OIDD613003 ( Syllabus )

Past Courses

  • EAS 499 - SENIOR CAPSTONE

    The Senior Capstone Project is required for all BAS degree students, in lieu of the senior design course. The Capstone Project provides an opportunity for the student to apply the theoretical ideas and tools learned from other courses. The project is usually applied, rather than theoretical, exercise, and should focus on a real world problem related to the career goals of the student. The one-semester project may be completed in either the fall or sprong term of the senior year, and must be done under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member. To register for this course, the student must submit a detailed proposal, signed by the supervising professor, and the student's faculty advisor, to the Office of Academic Programs two weeks prior to the start of the term.

  • MGMT891 - ADVANCED STUDY-SMGT

  • OIDD201 - TECH MGMT, INFO & D ECON

    OIDD201 introduces students to two critically important and tightly linked concepts. The first is online business model innovation, including key opportunities to exploit information-based strategies in businesses as diverse as Capital One and Uber (newly vulnerable markets) and Amazon and Airbnb (online channel conflict). The second is computer-based simulation modeling to assess the viability of an online innovation, the strategies for its launch, and its economic value.

  • OIDD210 - ONLINE BUSINESS MODELS

    This course provides a broad-based introduction to the management of information technology focusing on three interrelated themes: technology, organization, and strategy. The goal of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and tools to utilize information systems to pursue a firm's strategic and organizational goals. The course has no prerequisites other than a general interest in the applications of information technology.

  • OIDD613 - ONLINE BUSINESS MODELS

    Information technology has transformed many industries, including media, financial services, and retailing, among others. These technologies have changed not only how we produce services (e.g., outsourcing and offshoring, and their newest extension, cloud computing) but what services we offer (virtual experiences, online advertising, long tail products and services, and social networking). The purpose of this course is to improve understanding of how information technologies enable transformation of business models within existing organizations as well as the development of completely new business models and new organizational forms. The course will serve as an introductory course on information technologies and will serve as a foundation on which students can explore more advanced technology concepts.

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

Latest Research

Eric K. Clemons and Heinz Schimmelbusch (Working), Measuring Return on Strategic Agility: The Power of Agility when Facing Uncertainty and Strategic Ambiguity.
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In the News

Regulating Big Tech: Is a Day of Reckoning Coming?

Big Tech firms like Facebook, Amazon and Google have unorthodox business models, and the law has to catch up to protect consumers and small businesses, say experts.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2019/06/11
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