Bobbi Thomason

Bobbi Thomason
  • Visiting Lecturer / Senior Fellow

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3025 SH-DH
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Links: CV

Overview

Dr. Bobbi Thomason’s research explores how individuals of traditionally under-represented social categories work and pursue their careers globally. She is particularly interested in how individuals overcome inequality and social hierarchies in order to attain career rewards and resources, including leadership positions, financial compensation and social status. Her research also considers how individuals shape the social structures (e.g. organizations, families) around them in the process of attaining career rewards and resources. The first stream of her research is focused on gender, a category that creates stark hierarchies in the world of work. Dr. Thomason’s work contributes to existing scholarship by focusing on how women overcome barriers to their career ascension and by exploring how gender intersects with other identities, such as nationality. Within the second stream of her research, she explores the implications of other social categories in individuals’ work and careers. Within this second stream, she is particularly interested in the experience and perception of “locals” in the global employment market.

Dr. Thomason has worked in conflict management consulting and as a Research Associate at the Harvard Business School and the Harvard Kennedy School. She is the International Researcher for Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead and a contributor to the Lean In Foundation. Dr. Thomason and her work have been featured in national and international media, including The Huffington Post, Business Insider, PRI’s “The World”, Smithsonian Magazine and KQED. She holds a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown University, M.A. from Columbia University and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

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Research

  • May Al-Dabbagh, Hannah Riley Bowles, Bobbi Thomason (2016), Status Reinforcement in Emerging Economies: The Psychological Experience of Local Candidates Striving for Global Employment, Organization Science, 27 (6), pp. 1453-1471.

  • Sara Vaerlander, Pamela Hinds, Bobbi Thomason, Brandi Pearce, Heather Altman (2016), Enacting a Constellation of Logics: How Employees Recontextualize Practices in Global Organizations, Academy of Management Discoveries.

  • Hannah Riley Bowles and Bobbi Thomason, “Using Research to Generate Advice for Women: Examples from Negotiation Research”. In Selection and Assessment of Women and Men as Business Leaders: Challenges, Opportunities and Solutions, edited by Isabell Welpe, Prisca Brosi, Lisa Ritzenhofer, Tanja Schwarzmuller, (2015)

  • Bobbi Thomason (Working), How Women Overcome their “Lack of Fit” for Executive Leadership: Managing Ideals at Work and at Home (in preparation for submission to Organization Science).

  • Bobbi Thomason, Pamela Hinds, Brandi Pearce, Sara Vaerlander (Working), I love you, you’re perfect – don’t YOU change THAT!: Global Status Hierarchies in Transforming Localized Practices (targeting Spring 2017 submission to Organization Science).

  • Brandi Pearce, Pamela Hinds, Bobbi Thomason, Sara Vaerlander, Heather Altman (Working), Who Moved My Office? (in preparation for submission to Management Science).

  • Bobbi Thomason and Hannah Riley Bowles (Working), Asking, Bending, and Shaping: A Reconceptualization of Gender in Career Negotiations (in preparation for submission to Administrative Science Quarterly).

Teaching

Current Courses

  • LGST806 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

    LGST806411 ( Syllabus )

  • MGMT691 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806/OPIM 691.

    MGMT691411 ( Syllabus )

    MGMT691751

  • OIDD691 - Negotiations

    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. In this course we will work on both, studying economics and psychology for the science, and practicing actual negotiations for the art. Throughout we think of negotiation in general terms, relevant not only to salary negotiations and home buying, but performance evaluations, speeches, group collaborations and interpersonal relationships. We practice these kinds of negotiations in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person exercises. Potential reasons to skip this particular negotiation course: 1) We have a strong attendance policy, 2) We have strong no-computers/phones policies, 3) the course is very discussion oriented, 4) We survey your work colleagues about your influence tactics, and 5) you have a short assignment due almost every class. Beginning with the second week of class, if you miss one class you lose a letter grade. If you miss two classes you fail. We have this policy because it is an experiential class, and because your attendance directly affects classmates you are paired with. For some weeks you can attend another section if necessary. Cross-listed with MGMT691 and LGST806.

    OIDD691411

Past Courses

  • LGST806 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691. Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

  • MGMT691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806/OPIM 691.

  • OIDD691 - NEGOTIATIONS

    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. In this course we will work on both, studying economics and psychology for the science, and practicing actual negotiations for the art. Throughout we think of negotiation in general terms, relevant not only to salary negotiations and home buying, but performance evaluations, speeches, group collaborations and interpersonal relationships. We practice these kinds of negotiations in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person exercises. Potential reasons to skip this particular negotiation course: 1) We have a strong attendance policy, 2) We have strong no-computers/phones policies, 3) the course is very discussion oriented, 4) We survey your work colleagues about your influence tactics, and 5) you have a short assignment due almost every class. Beginning with the second week of class, if you miss one class you lose a letter grade. If you miss two classes you fail. We have this policy because it is an experiential class, and because your attendance directly affects classmates you are paired with. For some weeks you can attend another section if necessary. Cross-listed with MGMT691 and LGST806.

Activity

Latest Research

May Al-Dabbagh, Hannah Riley Bowles, Bobbi Thomason (2016), Status Reinforcement in Emerging Economies: The Psychological Experience of Local Candidates Striving for Global Employment, Organization Science, 27 (6), pp. 1453-1471.
All Research