Photo of Samir Nurmohamed

Samir Nurmohamed

Assistant Professor

Research Interests: motivation, behavioral ethics, power and status, competition

Links: CV

Contact Information

Address: 2106 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: nurmo@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 898-6386
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

 

Professor Samir Nurmohamed's research asks how the expectations of others impact employees at the workplace. In this vein, he conducts research in two major areas: employee motivation and behavioral ethics. His first stream of research, motivation, examines how individuals’ relationships with others impacts their motivation in organizations, with a primary focus on how being perceived as an underdog can influence the energy and effort that employees are willing to invest into their work. His second research area, behavioral ethics, examines the processes by which leaders’ and coworkers’ actions motivate employees to engage in behaviors that are aimed at improving organizational functioning, such as citizenship and reporting unethical conduct. As such, whereas much existing theory and research places a strong emphasis on individuals’ cognitions or organizational and task structures in driving employee motivation, Professor Nurmohamed's research elucidates a social perspective on motivation by focusing on how employees’ relationships with others can enhance or reduce their motivation at the workplace.

Professor Nurmohamed has taught power and politics in the undergraduate, MBA, and executive education programs. He completed his Ph.D. in Management and Organizations at the University of Michigan, and holds his B.A. in Economics and Philosophy from The University of Western Ontario.


 

Research


  • David M. Mayer, Samir Nurmohamed, Linda Klebe Trevino, Debra Shapiro, Marshall Schminke (2013), Encouraging employees to report unethical conduct internally: It takes a village, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes    Abstract
  • Adam Grant, Samir Nurmohamed, Susan J. Ashford, Kathryn Dekas (2011), The performance implications of ambivalent initiative: The interplay of autonomous and controlled motivations, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 116, 241 - 251.    Abstract

Courses

Current

  • MGMT272 - Power and Politics in Organizations

    The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the power dynamics in organizations. The course is designed so that you will learn concepts that are useful for understanding, analyzing, and harnessing power. But beyond discovering ways to extend your own power, influence and political skill in organizations, we will also uncover lessons about ways in which power and politics can blind you, and how to navigate situations in which you are up against powerful people. Using a range of theoretical and business articles, cases, exercises, assessments and simulations, we will extract a variety of lessons about power and politics in organizations. Topics include political skill, influence, issue selling, change management, networks, hierarchy, political conflict, corruption, coping with intolerable bosses, speaking up, redemption, and downsizing.

    MGMT272001  ( Syllabus

  • MGMT772 - Power and Politics in Organizations

    The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the power dynamics in organizations. The course is designed so that you will learn concepts that are useful for understanding, analyzing, and harnessing power. But beyond discovering ways to extend your own power, influence and political skill in organizations, we will also uncover lessons about ways in which power and politics can blind you,and how to navigate situations in which you are up against powerful people. Using a range of theoretical and business articles, cases, exercises, assesments, and simulations, we will extract a variety of lessons about power and politics in organizations. Topics include political skill, influence, issue selling, change management, networks, hierarchy, political conflict, corruption, coping with intolerable bosses, speaking up, redemption, and downsizing.

    MGMT772001  ( Syllabus