Photo of Nicholas Lobuglio

Nicholas Lobuglio

Doctoral Student

Contact Information

Address: 2058 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: lobuglio@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 898-1235
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

I am a Ph.D. student in the Management Department, focusing on organizational behavior, at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. My research interests include the formation and maintenance of relationships, affective culture and its influence on communication and expression, and strong emotional experiences at work and their lingering effects. I received my B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2009, and worked for a consulting firm in Washington, D.C. prior to entering the doctoral program in 2011. My personal interests include Ultimate Frisbee, choral singing, and zoology.

Courses

Current

  • MGMT101 - Introduction To Management

    This course is an introduction to the critical management skills involved in planning, structuring, controlling and leading an organization. It provides a framework for understanding issues involved in both managing and being managed, and it will help you to be a more effective contributor to organizations that you join. We develop a "systems" view of organizations, which means that we examine organizations as part of a context, including but not limited to environment, strategy, structure, culture, tasks, people and outputs. We consider how managerial decisions made in any one of these domains affect decisions in each of the others.

    MGMT101201  ( Syllabus

    MGMT101206  ( Syllabus

Previous

  • MGMT101 - Introduction To Management

    This course is an introduction to the critical management skills involved in planning, structuring, controlling and leading an organization. It provides a framework for understanding issues involved in both managing and being managed, and it will help you to be a more effective contributor to organizations that you join. We develop a "systems" view of organizations, which means that we examine organizations as part of a context, including but not limited to environment, strategy, structure, culture, tasks, people and outputs. We consider how managerial decisions made in any one of these domains affect decisions in each of the others.