Photo of David Hsu

David Hsu

Richard A. Sapp Professor

Professor of Management

Research Interests: intellectual property rights, start-up innovation, strategies for commercializing technological innovation, venture capital

Links: CV, Personal Website

  • MGMT611 - Managing Established Enterprises

    The management of large, established enterprises creates a range of multi-facet challenges for the general manager. A general manager needs to understand the internal workings of a firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account increasing, globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that effective of an established enterprise requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy.

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    Emerging enterprises, the focus in this course, are small, new, fast-growing organizations. Their founders and managers face multifaceted challenges: how to assess the competitive position of their business model and develop a strategy; how to develop the internal organizational structure, culture, and policies for selecting and managing employees; and how to pursue global opportunities. We cover these challenges in separate modules on strategy, human and social capital, and global issues. The human and social capital module covers classic management challenges of aligning interests of the individual and the organization; managing individual psychological needs and social influences; and developing employee capabilities that provide competitive advantage. Also covered are unique challenges that yound organizations face, i.e. building an effective culture; recruiting, selecting, and retaining talent; building systematic approaches to motivating employees; coping with the stresses of rapid growth; and leveraging the benefits (and avoiding the liabilities) of the founder's powerful imprint.

  • MGMT801 - Entrepreneurship

    There are two versions of MGMT 801 this fall, thought both teach the same foundation material in the Entrepreneurial Management program and have the schedules and content. However, the 10:30 sections are the SIMULATION sections. Just as in the other 801 classes, in the Simulation sections the final team project will involve developing a pitch for a new business (you can work across sections with groups doing the standard versions of 801), but you will also be playing the award-winning Looking Glass entrepreneurship simulation rather than doing individual reaction papers. The Looking Glass simulation is an intense and fun 3-week simulation that is played outside of class and gives you the chance to experience what running a startup company is like. The simulation takes more time during the three weeks it runs, thought total time commitments are the same across both class versions. MGMT 801 serves as both a stand-alone and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and implementing a business plan (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806).

  • MGMT893 - Advanced Study Project for Entrepreneurial Management

  • MGMT932 - PhD Pro-Seminar in Technology Strategy & Innovation

    This quarter-length doctoral seminar deals with major streams of management research in technology strategy and innovation. We will focus on both classical topics such as technological change and industry evolution and new emergent topics such as ecosystems and platforms. The focus will be to understand the link between technologies and firms in terms of both strategy choices and performance outcomes.

  • WH 212 - Advanced Study Project for Entrepreneurial Management