Photo of David Hsu

David Hsu

Richard A. Sapp Associate Professor

Associate Professor of Management

Research Interests: intellectual property rights, start-up innovation, strategies for commercializing technological innovation, venture capital

Links: CV, Personal Website

Contact Information

Address: 2028 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: dhsu@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 746-0125
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

David Hsu is Associate Professor of Management (with tenure) at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He graduated from Stanford University with undergraduate majors in economics and political science. After a few years working in industry, he received his master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University, followed by his Ph.D. in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Hsu’s research interests are in entrepreneurial innovation and management. Within that domain, he has investigated topics such as intellectual property management, start-up innovation, technology commercialization strategy, and venture capital. His research has appeared in leading journals such as Journal of Finance, Management Science, RAND Journal of Economics, and Research Policy. He serves as an associate editor of the Entrepreneurship and Innovation department of Management Science. In 2008, Hsu was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Fellowship. At Wharton, he teaches two MBA electives, Entrepreneurship and Technology Strategy. At Penn, Hsu is Associate Faculty Director of the Weiss Tech House, which encourages and supports students in the creation, development, and commercialization of innovative technologies.

Research


  • Alessandro Marino, David Hsu (Working), Organizational Routines Development and Venture Performance.
  • Vikas A. Aggarwal, David Hsu, Andy Wu (Work In Progress), Production Team Organization and Firm-Level Innovation.
  • O. Bengtsson, David Hsu (2010), How Do Venture Capital Partners Match with Startup Founders?, Management Department Working Paper  Abstract
  • David Hsu, A. Marino (2010), Organizational Routines Development and New Venture Performance, Management Department Working Paper  Abstract
  • C. Eesley, David Hsu, E. B. Roberts (2009), Bringing Entrepreneurial Ideas to Life, Management Department Working Paper  Abstract
  • V. Aggarwal, David Hsu (2009), Modes of Cooperative R&D Commercialization by Start-ups, Strategic Management Journal, 30: 835-864.  Abstract
  • David Hsu, K. Lim (2009), The Antecedents and Innovation Consequences of Organizational Knowledge Brokering Capability, Management Department Working Paper  Abstract
  • J. Gans, David Hsu, S. Stern (2008), The Impact of Uncertain Intellectual Property Rights on the Market for Ideas: Evidence from Patent Grant Delays, Management Science, 54: 982-997.  Abstract
  • David Hsu (2007), Experienced Entrepreneurial Founders, Organizational Capital, and Venture Capital Funding, Research Policy, 36: 722-741.  Abstract
  • David Hsu, E. Roberts, C. Eesley (2007), Entrepreneurs from Technology-based Universities: Evidence from MIT, Research Policy, 36: 768-788.  Abstract
  • David Hsu, R. Ziedonis (2007), Patents as Quality Signals for Entrepreneurial Ventures, Management Department Working Paper  Abstract
  • David Hsu (2006), Venture Capitalists and Cooperative Start-up Commercialization Strategy, Management Science, 52: 204-219.  Abstract
  • David Hsu, M. Kenney (2005), Organizing Venture Capital: The Rise and Demise of American Research and Development Corporation, 1946-1973, Industrial and Corporate Change, 14: 579-616.  Abstract
  • David Hsu (2004), What Do Entrepreneurs Pay for Venture Capital Affiliation?, Journal of Finance, 59: 1805-1844.  Abstract
  • J. Gans, David Hsu, S. Stern (2002), When Does Start-up Innovation Spur the Gale of Creative Destruction?, RAND Journal of Economics, 33: 571-586.  Abstract

In The News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Courses

Current

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    The management of emerging enterprises - new, small, entrepreneurial organizations - creates a range of multi-faceted challenges for the entrepreneur, whether the founder (and founding team) or the first generation of management. Establishing an emerging organization's unique business model or value proposition (not to mention its survival) is often the overriding preoccupation, but even in a new, small organization, managers need to under- stand how to develop the internal workings of a new firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account ever-increasing globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy. The course has three main parts. The first major part of the course will deal with fundamental issues of strategy, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of an enterprise.

    The second part of the course stresses the fact that organizational life is built around a complex interplay of social forces. We will study how to develop and implement organizational designs and human resource systems that achieve competitive advantage through the management of people. The third part of the course stresses the deep and persistent cross-national differences in economic, political and social institutions that affect the strategy, social structure, performance and value of organizations. The course culminates in the Wharton Global Summit when we examine the general management challenges posed by a current crisis (e.g., Euro 2013?) or in a rapidly growing frontier market (e.g., Imbalances in China).

    MGMT612001  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612002  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612003  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612004  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612005  ( Syllabus

  • MGMT893 - Advanced Study Project for Entrepreneurial Management

    MGMT893003 

Previous

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    The management of emerging enterprises - new, small, entrepreneurial organizations - creates a range of multi-faceted challenges for the entrepreneur, whether the founder (and founding team) or the first generation of management. Establishing an emerging organization's unique business model or value proposition (not to mention its survival) is often the overriding preoccupation, but even in a new, small organization, managers need to under- stand how to develop the internal workings of a new firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account ever-increasing globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy. The course has three main parts. The first major part of the course will deal with fundamental issues of strategy, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of an enterprise.

  • MGMT801 - Entrepreneurship

    This is the foundation course in the Entrepreneurial Management program. The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth. While most of the examples in class will be drawn from new venture formation, the principles also apply to entrepreneurship in corporate settings and to non-profit entrepreneurship. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing and managing successful new ventures. The emphasis in this course is on applying and synthesizing concepts and techniques from functional areas of strategic management, finance, accounting, managerial economics, marketing, operations management, and organizational behavior in the context of new venture development. The class serves as both a stand alone class and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and implementing a business plan (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806).

  • MGMT893 - Advanced Study Project for Entrepreneurial Management