Photo of Nancy Rothbard

Nancy Rothbard

David Pottruck Professor

Chair, Management Department

Research Interests: emotion and identity, work motivation and engagement, work-life and career development, organizational behavior

Links: CV


  • MGMT610 - Foundations of Teamwork and Leadership

    Management 610 is the first core course in the MBA Program and it cannot be waived The first week of the fall term (in August) is dedicated to this formative and foundational experience. This course focuses on developing students' knowledge and skill set for teamwork and leadership. It is meant to be an intense immersion experience that draws strongly on the pedagogy of the Wharton Teamwork and Leadership Simulation, a team-based, highly interactive simulation that was custom-designed specifically to allow students to experience the core concepts they learn in this class. The three goals of thiscourse are for students to learn: 1. Leadership behaviors: how to enact the skills that contribute to a team's effective performance. 2. Team dynamics: how to be an effective team member, as well as how to best design work teams; 3. Organizational awareness: understanding organizational culture.

  • MGMT932 - PhD Pro-Seminar in Technology Strategy & Innovation

    This quarter-length doctoral seminar deals with major streams of management research in technology strategy and innovation. We will focus on both classical topics such as technological change and industry evolution and new emergent topics such as ecosystems and platforms. The focus will be to understand the link between technologies and firms in terms of both strategy choices and performance outcomes.

  • MGMT933 - Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Research in Management

    This course, is required of all first-year doctoral students in Management and open to other Penn students with permission, provides an introduction to the psychological and sociological roots of management theory and research. The courseis predicated on the belief that to be effective as a contemporary management scholar one needs a background in "the classics." Therefore, we will be reading classics from the fields of psychology and sociology in their original form during this semester.

  • MGMT961 - Advanced Topics in Micro-organizational Behavior

    The purpose of this quarter course is to continue to explore key concepts and research programs in the field of micro-organizational behavior that we began to study in MGMT 951. To do so, we will cover a blend of classic and contemporary literature so that we can appreciate the prevailing theories and findings in various areas of micro-organizational behavior. In addition, for each topic we will then try to go beyond the existing literature. We will work to increase our understanding by re-framing the research variables, altering the perspective, bringing in new theory, and comparing levels of analysis. Building on the topics we examined in MGMT 951, we will explore further organizational behavior topics including identity, fit, extra role behaviors, job design, creativity, status, power and influence.