Photo of Ethan Mollick

Ethan Mollick

Edward B. and Shirley R. Shils Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor of Management

Research Interests: crowdfunding, distributed and user innovation, entrepreneurial strategy, entrepreneurship in innovative industries, games and business, role of individuals in firm success, self-organization among individuals

Links: CV, Personal Website, Twitter

Contact Information

Address: 2026 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: emollick@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 898-6361
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

Prof. Ethan Mollick studies innovation and entrepreneurship, and the ways in which an individual’s actions can affect firms and industries. His research includes early-stage entrepreneurship and crowdfunding; the way in which communities come together to innovate; and the factors that drive the performance of entrepreneurial companies. He has published papers in leading academic journals, and he has among the 50 most downloaded authors (out of over 300,000) on the Social Science Research Network for the past three years. He was named one of the "40 Most Outstanding Business School Professors Under 40" and was awarded the Academy of Management (TIM Division) Emerging Scholar Award.

Prof. Mollick also co-authored a book on the intersection between video games and business that was named one of the American Library Association’s top ten business books of the year, and has studied the way that games can be used to motivate performance and to educate. His entrepreneurship simulations and games have won several awards, and are used by tens of thousands of students around the world.

Prior to his academic career, he was co-founder of a company and a management consultant. Prof. Mollick has worked with organizations ranging from DARPA to General Mills on innovation and entrepreneurship.

Ethan Mollick received his PhD (2010) and MBA (2004) from MIT's Sloan School of Management and his bachelor's degree from Harvard University, magna cum laude, in 1997.

Research


  • Ethan Mollick (2016), Filthy Lucre? Innovative Communities, Identity, and Commercialization, Organization Science, Forthcoming.  Abstract
  • Jason Greenberg, Ethan Mollick (2016), Leaning in or Leaning On? Gender, Homophily, and Activism in Crowdfunding, Administrative Science Quarterly, Forthcoming.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Venkat Kuppuswamy, "Crowdfunding: Evidence on the Democratization of Startup Funding". In Revolutionizing Innovation: Users, Communities, and Open Innovation, edited by Dietmar Harhoff, Karim Lakhani, (2016).
  • Venkat Kuppuswamy, Ethan Mollick (Under Review), Second Thoughts About Second Acts: Gender Differences in Serial Founding Rates.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Ramana Nanda (2016), Wisdom or Madness? Comparing Crowds with Expert Evaluation in Funding the Arts, Management Science, 62 (6), 1533 - 1553.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Alicia Robb (2016), Democratizing Innovation and Capital Access: The Role of Crowdfunding, California Management Review, 58 (2).  Abstract
  • Matthew Bidwell, Shinjae Won, Roxana Barbulescu, Ethan Mollick (2015), I Used to Work at Goldman Sachs! Status, Careers, and Competitive Advantage, Strategic Management Journal, 36 (8), 1164 - 1173.
  • Matthew Bidwell, Ethan Mollick (2015), Shifts and Ladders: Comparing the Role of Internal and External Mobility in Executive Careers, Organiztion Science, 26 (6), 1629 - 1645.    Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Venkat Kuppuswamy (Working), When Firms are Potemkin Villages: Entrepreneurs and Formal Organizations.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Venkat Kuppuswamy (Working), After the Campaign: Outcomes of Crowdfunding.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick (2014), The Dynamics of Crowdfunding: An Exploratory Study, Journal of Business Venturing, 29 (1), 1 - 16.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, Kevin Werbach, "Games and the Enterprise". In The Gameful World, edited by Stephen P. Walz, Sebastian Deterding, (2013), 439 - 458.  Related Materials
  • Ethan Mollick (2012), People and Process, Suits and Innovators: The Role of Individuals in Firm Performance, Strategic Management Journal, 33 (9), 1001 - 1015.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick, David Edery, Changing the Game: How Videogames are Transforming the Future of Business (2009).
  • Ethan Mollick (2006), Establishing Moore’s Law, IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, 28 (3): 62-75.  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick (2005), Working with the Underground, Sloan Management Review  Abstract
  • Ethan Mollick (2005), Engines of the Underground: The Elite-Kiddie Divide, ACM SIGGROUP Bulletin, Issue 25, Vol. 2.  Abstract

Awards And Honors

  • Reimagine Education Silver Award for MBA Education, 2015
  • AOM-TIM Emerging Scholar Award, 2015
  • AOM Careers Division Best Paper Award, 2014
  • Top 30 Influencers in Crowdfunding, 2014
  • Thinkers 50 Future Thinker Award Shortlist, 2013
  • Kauffman Junior Faculty Fellowship in Entrepreneurship Research, 2013
  • SMS Best Paper Award Nomination, 2012
  • Graduate Management Council Ideas to Innovation Challenge, 3rd Place, 2011
  • Heizer Award for Best Dissertation in Entrepreneurship, Finalist, 2011
  • Teaching Commitment and Curricular Innovation Award, 2011
  • American Library Association’s “Top Ten Business Books of 2009”, 2009
  • Kauffman Dissertation Fellow, 2007

In The News

Courses

Current

  • MGMT801 - Entrepreneurship

    There are two versions of MGMT 801 this fall, thought both teach the same foundation material in the Entrepreneurial Management program and have the schedules and content. However, the 10:30 sections are the SIMULATION sections. Just as in the other 801 classes, in the Simulation sections the final team project will involve developing a pitch for a new business (you can work across sections with groups doing the standard versions of 801), but you will also be playing the award-winning Looking Glass entrepreneurship simulation rather than doing individual reaction papers. The Looking Glass simulation is an intense and fun 3-week simulation that is played outside of class and gives you the chance to experience what running a startup company is like. The simulation takes more time during the three weeks it runs, thought total time commitments are the same across both class versions. MGMT 801 serves as both a stand-alone and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and implementing a business plan (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806).

    Format: Lectures and case discussions

    Requirements: Class participation, interim assignments, final project

    MGMT801001  ( Syllabus

    MGMT801002  ( Syllabus

    MGMT801003  ( Syllabus

    MGMT801004  ( Syllabus

    MGMT801005  ( Syllabus

    MGMT801006  ( Syllabus

  • MGMT806 - Formation and Implementation of Entrepreneurial Ventures

    This advanced course in entrepreneurship centers on writing a comprehensive business plan and implementation plan for a venture of your choice. The course examines ways to profitably launch and exploit business opportunities (as opposed to what opportunity to explore). It will allow you to acquire the skill set necessary for crafting a winning business model for your venture - developing and writing a coherent and effective plan to start a business in either an independent or a corporate setting. The venture must distinguish itself from existing companies through differential innovation; for example, through an innovative product or service, an innovative production process, a new business model, or by creating a new market. Students must have successfully completed MGMT 801 before enrolling in this course.

    Format: Highly interactive

    Requirements: Class participation, interim assignments.

    MGMT806701 

Previous

  • MGMT801 - Entrepreneurship

    There are two versions of MGMT 801 this fall, thought both teach the same foundation material in the Entrepreneurial Management program and have the schedules and content. However, the 10:30 sections are the SIMULATION sections. Just as in the other 801 classes, in the Simulation sections the final team project will involve developing a pitch for a new business (you can work across sections with groups doing the standard versions of 801), but you will also be playing the award-winning Looking Glass entrepreneurship simulation rather than doing individual reaction papers. The Looking Glass simulation is an intense and fun 3-week simulation that is played outside of class and gives you the chance to experience what running a startup company is like. The simulation takes more time during the three weeks it runs, thought total time commitments are the same across both class versions. MGMT 801 serves as both a stand-alone and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and implementing a business plan (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806).

  • MGMT806 - Formation and Implementation of Entrepreneurial Ventures

    This advanced course in entrepreneurship centers on writing a comprehensive business plan and implementation plan for a venture of your choice. The course examines ways to profitably launch and exploit business opportunities (as opposed to what opportunity to explore). It will allow you to acquire the skill set necessary for crafting a winning business model for your venture - developing and writing a coherent and effective plan to start a business in either an independent or a corporate setting. The venture must distinguish itself from existing companies through differential innovation; for example, through an innovative product or service, an innovative production process, a new business model, or by creating a new market. Students must have successfully completed MGMT 801 before enrolling in this course.

  • MGMT893 - Advanced Study Project for Entrepreneurial Management