Photo of John Paul MacDuffie

John Paul MacDuffie

Professor of Management

Research Interests: links between corporate strategy and high-performance work systems, flexible/lean production systems, organizational learning, collaborative problem-solving, diffusion of management practices, product, organizational, and industry architecture, determinants of location decisions, managing people over distance

Links: CV


  • MGMT611 - Managing Established Enterprises

    The management of large, established enterprises creates a range of multi-facet challenges for the general manager. A general manager needs to understand the internal workings of a firm, how to assess and create a strategy,an how to take into account increasing, globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy.

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    The management of emerging enterprises - new, small, entrepreneurial organizations - creates a range of multi-faceted challenges for the entrepreneur, whether the founder (and founding team) or the first generation of management. Establishing an emerging organization's unique business model or value proposition (not to mention its survival) is often the overriding preoccupation, but even in a new, small organization, managers need to under- stand how to develop the internal workings of a new firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account ever-increasing globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy. The course has three main parts. The first major part of the course will deal with fundamental issues of strategy, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of an enterprise.

  • MGMT613 - Career Planning

  • MGMT621 - MGMT OF PEOPLE AT WRK

    Inactive

  • MGMT653 - Field Application Project

    FAP is an experiential-based course where learning is done outside of the classroom. It is unique in its lack of a classroom setting all meetings take place in a professor's office in small teams of 4 to 6 students. Teams are faced withreal-time issues of outside organizations and work with faculty and host managers to construct innovative solutions. Solutions are integrative and cross-functional in nature. We encourage creative thinking giving students wide access towhat we call "area of expertise" faculty. Depending on the project scope we help students arrange meetings with professors who are experts in their field. Host organizations range from large multinational firms to start-ups. A significant percentage of the projects are with non-profits and organizations focused on social causes.

  • MGMT751 - Strategic Management of Human Assets

    Successful firms often excel in the capability of employing and deploying human assets (resources) to achieve the effective implementation of business strategy. To understand this capability, this course will address two central themes: 1) How to think systematically and strategically about various aspects of managing the organization's human assets; and 2) What really needs to be done to implement these policies and achieve competitive advantage. In order to think "systematically" about this topic for any particular organization, we will consider the bundles of work practices and human resources processes that make up the overall system for managing people and evaluate whether these are internally consistent and aligned ("internal fit"). To think "strategically," we will then assess the relationship between practices/processes of managing people and the firm's strategy and strategic context, e.g. industry structure, competitive landscape, political, social, and economic environment -- for evidence of external fit. By paying attention to implementation, we will recognize that although many organizations recognize the importance of managing the workforce effectively (and even "know" what approaches have been effective elsewhere), firms and managers very often fail to implement these approaches.