Photo of John Paul MacDuffie

John Paul MacDuffie

Professor of Management

Research Interests: links between corporate strategy and high-performance work systems, flexible/lean production systems, organizational learning, collaborative problem-solving, diffusion of management practices, product, organizational, and industry architecture, determinants of location decisions, managing people over distance

Links: CV

Contact Information

Address: 3105 SH-DH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: macduffie@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 898-2588
Office Fax: (215) 898-0401

Overview

Professor MacDuffie is Professor of Management at the Wharton School and Director of the Program on Vehicle and Mobility Innovation (PVMI) at Wharton's Mack Institute for Innovation Management.  PVMI carries on the work of the International Motor Vehicle Program (IMVP), the research network founded at M.I.T. to study the challenges facing the global automotive industry, which Professor MacDuffie co-directed from 2001-2012. He received his B.A. degree from Harvard University and his Ph.D. degree from the Sloan School of Management at M.I.T.

Prof. MacDuffie’s research examines the diffusion of lean or flexible production as an alternative to mass production; the impact of human resource systems and work organization on economic performance; collaborative problem-solving within and across firms; and the relationship between product and organizational architecture. His global research on the determinants of high-performance manufacturing is featured centrally in the books The Machine That Changed the World and After Lean Production: Evolving Employment Practices in the World Auto Industry. His research and commentary on the global automotive industry and trends in employment systems are featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Bloomberg Business Week, Fortune, Harvard Business Review, and on National Public Radio and Knowledge@Wharton. He is a founding board member of the Industry Studies Association; a member of the Automotive Experts Group at the Federal Reserve Bank; and a member of the Automotive Industry Agenda Council for the World Economic Forum.

Research


  • John Paul MacDuffie (2013), Modularity-as-Property, Modularization-as-Process, and ‘Modularity’-as-Frame: Product Architecture Initiatives in the Global Auto Industry, Global Strategy Journal, 3, 8 - 40.    Abstract
  • Michael Jacobides, John Paul MacDuffie (2013), How to Drive Value Your Way, Harvard Business Review  
  • Harry C. Katz, John Paul MacDuffie, Frits K. Pil, "Crisis and Recovery in the U.S. Auto Industry: Tumultuous Times for a Collective Bargaining Pacesetter". In Collective Bargaining Under Duress: Case Studies of Major North American Industries, edited by Howard R Stanger, Paul F Clark, Ann C Frost, (2013), (forthcoming).  
  • John Paul MacDuffie (2011), Inter-organizational trust and the dynamics of distrust, Journal of International Business Studies, 42(1): 35-47.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie, K. Jaewon, F. K. Pil (2010), Employee Voice and Organizational Performance: Team vs. Representative Influence, Human Relations, 63(3): 371-394.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie, Takahiro Fujimoto (2010), Get Ready for the Complexity Revolution: Why Automakers Will Keep Ruling the Auto Industry, Harvard Business Review  
  • Paul S. Adler, Mary Benner, David J. Brunner, John Paul MacDuffie, Emi Osono, Bradley R. Staats, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Michael L. Tushman, Sidney G Winter (2009), Perspectives on the Productivity Dilemma, Journal of Operations Management, 27: 99-113.  
  • Paul S. Adler, Mary Benner, David J. Brunner, John Paul MacDuffie, Emi Osono, Bradley Staats, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Michael L. Tushman, Sydney G. Winter (2009), Perspectives on the Productivity Dilemma, Journal of Operations Management, 27 (2), 99 - 113.
  • John Paul MacDuffie (2008), HRM and Distributed Work: Managing People Over Distance, Academy of Management Annals  
  • John Paul MacDuffie, S. Helper (2007), Collaboration in Supply Chains: With and Without Trust, The Firm as Collaborative Community, Charles Heckscher and Paul Adler (eds.), New York: Oxford University Press, 416-466.
  • Bruce Kogut, John Paul MacDuffie, Charles Ragin (2004), Prototypes and Strategy: Assigning Causal Credit Using Fuzzy Sets, European Management Review, 1: 114-131.    Abstract
  • Susan Helper, John Paul MacDuffie (2003), B2B and Modes of Exchange: Evolutionary and Transformative Effects, The Global Internet Economy, 331-380.  
  • John Paul MacDuffie (2003), Leaning Towards Teams: Divergent and Convergent Trends in Diffusion of Lean Production Work Practices, Negotiations and Change, 94-116.  
  • Larry W. Hunter, John Paul MacDuffie, Lorna Doucet (2002), What Makes Teams Take? Employee Reactions to Work Reforms, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 55(3).    Abstract
  • Harry C. Katz, John Paul MacDuffie, Frits K. Pil (2002), Autos: Continuity and Change in Collective Bargaining, Collective Bargaining in the Private Sector, 55-90.  
  • S. Helper, John Paul MacDuffie, C. Sabel (2000), Pragmatic Collaborations: Advancing Knowledge While Controlling Opportunism, Industrial and Corporate Change, 9(3).    Abstract
  • Frits K. Pil, John Paul MacDuffie (1999), What Makes Transplants Thrive: Managing the Transfer of, Journal of World Business, 34(4): 372-391.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie (1997), The Road to 'Root Cause': Shop-Floor Problem-Solving at Three Auto Assembly Plants, Management Science, 43(4): 479-502.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie, S. Helper (1997), Creating Lean Suppliers: Diffusing Lean Production Through the Supply Chain, California Management Review, 39(4): 118-151.    Abstract
  • F.K. Pil, John Paul MacDuffie (1996), The Adoption of High Involvement Work Practices, Industrial Relations, 35(3): 423-455.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie, K. Sethuraman, M. L. Fisher (1996), Product Variety and Manufacturing Performance: Evidence from the International Automotive Assembly Plant Study, Management Science, 42(3): 350-369.    Abstract  Related Materials
  • John Paul MacDuffie (1996), International Trends in Work Organization in the Auto Industry: National-Level vs. Company-Level Perspectives, The Comparative Political Economy of Industrial Relations, 71-113.  
  • John Paul MacDuffie, Frits K. Pil (1996), From Fixed to Flexible: Automation and Work Organization Trends from the International Assembly Plant Study, Transforming Auto Assembly, 238-254.  
  • John Paul MacDuffie (1995), Human Resource Bundles and Manufacturing Performance: Organizational Logic and Flexible Production Systems in the World Auto Industry, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 48(2): 197-221.    Abstract
  • John Paul MacDuffie, T.A. Kochan (1995), Do U.S. Firms Invest Less in Human Resources? Training in the World Auto Industry, Industrial Relations, 34(2): 147-168.    Abstract
  • C. Ittner, John Paul MacDuffie (1995), Explaining Plant-Level Differences In Manufacturing Overhead: Structural And Executional Cost Drivers In The World Auto Industry, Production and Operations Management, 4(4): 312-334.    Abstract
  • Harry C. Katz, John Paul MacDuffie (1995), Collective Bargaining in the U.S. Auto Assembly Sector, Contemporary Collective Bargaining in the Private Sector, 181-224.  
  • Marshall L. Fisher, Anjani Jain, John Paul MacDuffie (1995), Strategies for Product Variety: Lessons from the Auto Industry, Redesigning the Firm, 116-154.  
  • John Paul MacDuffie (1995), Workers’ Roles in Lean Production: The Implications for Worker Representation, Lean Work: Empowerment and Exploitation in the Global Auto Industry, 54-69.  
  • John Paul MacDuffie, Frits K. Pil (1995), The International Assembly Plant Study: Philosophical and Methodological Issues, Lean Work: Empowerment and Exploitation in the Global Auto Industry, 181-196.  
  • Anjani Jain, Marshall L. Fisher, John Paul MacDuffie, Strategies for Product Variety: Lessons From the Auto Industry (1994).  
  • John Paul MacDuffie, John F. Krafcik (1992), Integrating Technology and Human Resources for High Performance Manufacturing: Evidence from the International Auto Industry, Transforming Organizations, 209-226.  

Awards And Honors

  • MBA Executive Excellence in Teaching Award for Core Curriculum (San Francisco), University of Pennsylvania, 2012
  • Industry Agenda Council (Automotive), World Economic Forum, 2010-2012
  • Member of Automotive Experts Group, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, 2010-2013
  • Member of Board of Directors, Industry Studies Association, 2008-2013
  • Advisor to Automotive Governors (CEO group), World Economic Forum, 2004-2007
  • MBA Excellence in Teaching Award for Core Curriculum, University of Pennsylvania, 2000
  • Outstanding Young Scholar Award, Industrial Relations Research Association, 1997
  • MBA Excellence in Teaching Award for Core Curriculum, University of Pennsylvania, 1996-1998
  • Miller-Sherrerd Teaching Award for MBA Core Courses, University of Pennsylvania, 1994
  • Undergraduate Division Excellence in Teaching Award, University of Pennsylvania, 1992
  • Zannetos PhD Thesis Prize, Sloan School of Management, MIT, 1991
  • International Professional Practice Research Award, American Society of Training and Development, 1989

In The News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Courses

Current

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    The management of emerging enterprises - new, small, entrepreneurial organizations - creates a range of multi-faceted challenges for the entrepreneur, whether the founder (and founding team) or the first generation of management. Establishing an emerging organization's unique business model or value proposition (not to mention its survival) is often the overriding preoccupation, but even in a new, small organization, managers need to under- stand how to develop the internal workings of a new firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account ever-increasing globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy. The course has three main parts. The first major part of the course will deal with fundamental issues of strategy, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of an enterprise.

    The second part of the course stresses the fact that organizational life is built around a complex interplay of social forces. We will study how to develop and implement organizational designs and human resource systems that achieve competitive advantage through the management of people. The third part of the course stresses the deep and persistent cross-national differences in economic, political and social institutions that affect the strategy, social structure, performance and value of organizations. The course culminates in the Wharton Global Summit when we examine the general management challenges posed by a current crisis (e.g., Euro 2013?) or in a rapidly growing frontier market (e.g., Imbalances in China).

    MGMT612001  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612002  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612003  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612004  ( Syllabus

    MGMT612005  ( Syllabus

  • MGMT751 - Strategic Management of Human Assets

    This course introduces the student to the strategic role human resource management might play in creating competitive advantages for firms. We study P/HRM policies and practices in context and consider broader corporate strategies, business activities, and competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace. We give attention to the diversity of the American workforce, and to the effects of changing technologies in production and in provision of services.

    MGMT751751 

Previous

  • MGMT611 - Managing Established Enterprises

    The management of large, established enterprises creates a range of multi-facet challenges for the general manager. A general manager needs to understand the internal workings of a firm, how to assess and create a strategy,an how to take into account increasing, globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy.

  • MGMT612 - Management of Emerging Enterprises

    The management of emerging enterprises - new, small, entrepreneurial organizations - creates a range of multi-faceted challenges for the entrepreneur, whether the founder (and founding team) or the first generation of management. Establishing an emerging organization's unique business model or value proposition (not to mention its survival) is often the overriding preoccupation, but even in a new, small organization, managers need to under- stand how to develop the internal workings of a new firm, how to assess and create a strategy, and how to take into account ever-increasing globalization. While these issues are distinct, they are very much intertwined. As a result, this course will provide you with an integrated view of these challenges and show you that successful management in the 21st century requires a combination of insights drawn from economics, sociology, psychology and political economy. The course has three main parts. The first major part of the course will deal with fundamental issues of strategy, examining issues central to the long- and short-term competitive position of an enterprise.

  • MGMT613 - Career Planning

  • MGMT621 - MGMT OF PEOPLE AT WRK

    Inactive

  • MGMT653 - Field Application Project

    FAP is an experiential-based course where learning is done outside of the classroom. It is unique in its lack of a classroom setting all meetings take place in a professor's office in small teams of 4 to 6 students. Teams are faced withreal-time issues of outside organizations and work with faculty and host managers to construct innovative solutions. Solutions are integrative and cross-functional in nature. We encourage creative thinking giving students wide access towhat we call "area of expertise" faculty. Depending on the project scope we help students arrange meetings with professors who are experts in their field. Host organizations range from large multinational firms to start-ups. A significant percentage of the projects are with non-profits and organizations focused on social causes.

  • MGMT751 - Strategic Management of Human Assets

    This course introduces the student to the strategic role human resource management might play in creating competitive advantages for firms. We study P/HRM policies and practices in context and consider broader corporate strategies, business activities, and competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace. We give attention to the diversity of the American workforce, and to the effects of changing technologies in production and in provision of services.

  • MGMT892 - Advanced Study Project - Technological Innovation

    Corporate partners will propose a current business challenge they'd like to address; the Mack Institute will identify potential collaborators and facilitate the connection between the various parties. Guided by Wharton faculty, students selected for the program may provide the following: industry analysis, competitor analysis, general environment analysis (trends and uncertainties including political, technological, global, and sociocultural segments), and assessmentof the organization's internal strengths and weaknesses. Specific analysis willdepend on the questions the corporate partner organizations want to address. Anyone interested in the program may contact us directly at mackinstitute@wharton.upenn.edu. The institute's corporate partners include the following industries: automotive, pharmaceuticals, electronics, consumer products, government, and professional services.