Photo of Iwan Barankay

Iwan Barankay

Associate Professor

Associate Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

Research Interests: personnel economics, behavioral economics, field experiments, political economy

Contact Information

Address: 2201 SHDH, 3620 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Email: barankay@wharton.upenn.edu
Office: (215) 898-6372

Overview

Education

PhD, University of Warwick, 2004; MSc, University of Warwick, 1999; BSc, University of Lausanne, 1998

Recent Consulting

Workplace Incentives for a broad range of industries

Academic Positions Held

Wharton: 2008-present. Previous apointments: Essex University; University of Warwick

Professional Leadership

Research Fellow, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR)

Research Fellow, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Sloan Research Fellow (2010-2014)

Affiliated Faculty Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics at the Leonard David Institute of the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Research

Research

My research focuses on monetary and non-monetary incentives to shape individual level productivity both in the workplace and as a method to improve health behavior.

New: RO1 NIH $2.3m grant for a four-year randomized control trial to study financial incentives rooted in behavioral economics and how they can shape long-lasting health habits (medication adherence).


  • Iwan Barankay (Under Revision), Rank Incentives: Evidence from a Randomized Workplace Experiment (Revise and Resubmit at Management Science).    Abstract
  • Iwan Barankay (Under Review), Rankings and Social Tournaments: Evidence from a Crowd-Sourcing Experiment.  Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2012), Team Incentives: Evidence from a Firm Level Experiment, Journal of the European Economic Association, forthcoming.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2011), Field Experiments with Firms , Journal of Economic Perspectives, 25, 63 - 82.
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2010), Social Incentives in the Workplace, Review of Economic Studies, 77 (2), 417 - 458.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2009), Social Connections and Incentives in the Workplace: Evidence from Personnel Data, Econometrica, 77 (4), 1047 - 1094.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2008), Social Capital in the Workplace: Evidence on its Formation and Consequences, Labor Economics, Vol 15, 725-749.    Abstract
  • Iwan Barankay, Ben Lockwood (2007), Decentralization and the Productive Efficiency of Government: Evidence from Swiss Cantons, Journal of Public Economics, Vol 91(5-6) 1197-1218.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2007), Incentives for Managers and Inequality Among Workers: Evidence from a Firm Level Experiment, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 122(2), 729-773.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2006), The Evolution of Cooperative Norms: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment, Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, Vol 6(2), Art 4.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2005), Social Preferences and the Response to Incentives: Evidence from Personnel Data, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 120(3) 917-962.    Abstract
  • Oriana Bandiera, Iwan Barankay, Imran Rasul (2005), Cooperation in Collective Action, Economics of Transition, Vol 13(3), 473-498.    Abstract
  • Iwan Barankay, Pascal Sciarini, Alexander H. Trechsel (2003), Institutional openness and the use of referendums and popular initiatives: Evidence from Swiss Cantons, Swiss Political Science Review, Vol 9(1), 169-199.    Abstract

Awards And Honors

In The News

Courses

Current

  • MGMT691 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation, with additional emphasis on conflict resolution. Students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one-issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with MGMT 691/OPIM 691.

    Format: Lecture, class discussion, simulation/role play, and video demonstrations. Materials: Textbook and course pack.

    LGST806411 

    LGST806412 

    MGMT691411 

    MGMT691412 

Previous

  • MGMT691 - Negotiations

    This course examines the art and science of negotiation. This course develops managerial skills by combining lectures with practice, using exercises where students negotiate with each other. Over the course of the semester, students will engage in a number of simulated negotiations ranging from simple one issue transactions to multi-party joint ventures. Through these exercises and associated readings, students explore the basic theoretical models of bargaining and have an opportunity to test and improve their negotiation skills. Cross-listed with LGST 806/OPIM 691.